The Gold Rush Trail Management Committee is delighted to unveil a new mural at the Vancouver Convention Centre (VCC) breezeway marking the diverse history of the Gold Rush Trail. The VCC’s display shares the Gold Rush Trail’s brand message - “History Shaped by Nature.” SUBMITTED PHOTO

Gold Rush Trail Mural features in Vancouver Convention Centre breezeway

Huge mural will increase awareness of GRT’s modern-day treasures and experiences

The Gold Rush Trail Management Committee is delighted to unveil a new mural at the Vancouver Convention Centre (VCC) breezeway marking the diverse history of the Gold Rush Trail.

The 47- by 8.5-foot wall mural located in this high-visibility, high-traffic location is intended to increase awareness of the Gold Rush Trail’s modern-day treasures, and reach potential new visitors.

The Gold Rush Trail is a stunning driving route located right on the doorstep of two million Vancouverites and visitors to British Columbia. Running from New Westminster to Barkerville, the route is bookended by two National Historic Sites, Fort Langley and Barkerville.

The VCC’s display shares the Gold Rush Trail’s brand message – “History Shaped by Nature.”

With a diverse topography of rivers, lakes, mountains, canyons, grasslands and forests, this is a land that’s treasures go far beyond the gold underground. Here, Indigenous Peoples and settlers alike were drawn and supported by nature’s abundance creating a diverse, multicultural colony that would become British Columbia.

“We are excited to see this project completed. It is a really unique way to showcase our heritage in such a way that people will want to make the trip to see it in person,” says Amy Thacker, CEO of Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Tourism Association, which leads the Gold Rush Trail Management Committee.

“The Gold Rush Trail has to be experienced in person to appreciate the full extent of its beauty and history.”

As travellers make their way up the iconic Cariboo Wagon Road, they will find an extensive range of authentic Gold Rush Trail experiences. Some of those highlighted in the display include:

• Living history and interpretive sites include museums, homesteads, working farms, heritage sites, general stores, gardens, 19th century churches, boardwalks, saloons, gold panning, and stagecoach rides. • Outdoor recreational opportunities, such as kayaking, river rafting, mountain biking, hiking, fishing, geocaching, wildlife-viewing, Nordic skiing and snowmobiling .

• Indigenous tourism experiences, including storytelling by village elders, wilderness walks, salmon lunches, and overnight accommodation in pit houses and teepees.

• Arts festivals, powwows, a busy circuit of rodeos, and many other popular events.

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