Maintenance on the Trans Mountain pipeline, which has run from Alberta to B.C. and Washington since 1954. (Black Press files)

Indigenous bidders for Trans Mountain pipeline await Ottawa decision

Multiple offers line up for controlling stake in pipeline

There are as many as half a dozen Indigenous groups interested in an equity stake in the Trans Mountain pipeline and its expansion project from Alberta to the coast, and Shane Gottfriedson wants his bid to emerge as the winner.

Gottfriedson, former chief of the Kamloops-based Tk’emlups te Secwepemc, is now B.C. director of Project Reconciliation, which hopes to lead the effort to acquire a majority stake in Trans Mountain. The oil and fuel pipeline that has run through his territory since 1954 is a step towards financial self-sufficiency for up to 300 Indigenous groups in Western Canada, Gottfriedson said during a visit to the B.C. legislature Wednesday.

The federal cabinet is expected to announce approval of the project on June 18, after a court-ordered review of Indigenous consultation and the impact of expanded crude oil shipping on marine life.

“We’ve had some preliminary discussions with the federal government,” Gottfriedson said. “We’re anxiously waiting for the June 18 decision to come down so we can continue to move forward.”

Project Reconciliation is preparing to announce a financial partner in the venture in the coming weeks, he said.

“We are offering all Indigenous groups in Western Canada – more than 300 in B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan – to sign up as majority shareholders for a 51 per cent stake in the Trans Mountain pipeline,” Gottfriedson said. “As a former chief I am here to tell you, it is high time we shifted our focus from managing historic poverty to managing future prosperity.”

Project Reconciliation vows to put 80 per cent of its pipeline profits into a “sovereign wealth fund” to develop infrastructure and businesses in Indigenous communities.

RELATED: B.C., Alberta Indigenous leaders to bid for pipeline share

RELATED: Trudeau touts pipeline to supporters in B.C. speech

Another equity proposal is being proposed by the Alberta-based Indian Resources Council, representing Treaty 6, 7 and 8 communities in Alberta, Treaty 8 communities in B.C.’s northeast and communities in Saskatchewan.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Quesnel pitcher joins all native women’s softball team on trip to California

Parr, 15, will be the youngest player on the Secwepemc Saints

Spiers is top Quesnel bull rider in 2019

A drive for success, a clear mind and injury avoidance have helped the rider this season

Fire claims two historic buildings in downtown Williams Lake

Several other businesses damaged by water used to fight the blaze

Barkerville Gold Mines getting closer to finalizing project description for new mine

The Cariboo Gold Project is a proposed underground mine near Wells with an 11-year mine life

VIDEO: A moment to remember during the World Lacrosse Men’s Indoor Championship in B.C.

Diego Hernandez Valenzuela’s team lost, but he felt like a winner Saturday

B.C. Lions hype-man marks 15 years of cheers

Crazy P cheers, chants, bangs his drum and spreads a message of love

PHOTOS: Steller sea lion with plastic around neck rescued on Vancouver Island

Rescue staff determined the plastic band cut the protected animal’s neck approximately two inches

B.C. VIEWS: School officials join fact-free ‘climate strike’

Students, public get distorted picture of greenhouse gases

Handgun crackdown, health spending and transit plans latest campaign promises

Friday was the end of a busy week on the campaign trail

B.C. woman photographs massive ant swarm on Abbotsford driveway

She asked what the ants were doing? The answer: war

Iconic 90s TV show ‘Friends’ celebrates 25th anniversary

The iconic, decade-long television show aired its first episode 25 years ago today

Police arrest B.C. phone scammer linked to illegal call centres in India

Person arrested in Burnaby here on a work visa, says police

Most Read