Crystal Lindsay, Danna Sheck and Stephanie Pladson are to launch a CBD-infused water product. (Contributed photo)

Three B.C. moms to launch CBD-infused water

Three friends say benefits may include anxiety relief, pain management

A group of South Surrey mothers plan to be among the first to enter the blooming cannabis industry, one sip at a time.

Crystal Lindsay, Danna Sheck and Stephanie Pladson have partnered with Grow Tech Labs to launch Crysteda, a cannabidiol (CBD)-infused water company.

While the mothers wait to hear what the federal regulations regarding edible cannabis products will be in Canada – expected to be announced Oct. 17 – they have been developing their CBD-infused water in California.

The canned water – an effort to reduce single-use plastic water bottles – is to contain 5mg of CBD, a non-psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. The women told Peace Arch News last week that their product will not include tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

While the mothers were careful not to make health claims about the benefits of ingesting CBD, according to Health Canada, CBD does not produce a high or intoxication, but has possible therapeutic uses.

Drawing from personal experience, however, the women all agreed on three key benefits received from ingesting CBD: pain relief, anxiety relief and a sleeping aid.

Sheck, an athlete and mother of three, said she started taking CBD to help with pain and inflammation.

SEE ALSO: Ben & Jerry’s CBD-infused ice cream could be in a freezer near you soon

“That’s how I was introduced to CBD. I’ve been taking it forever. Once I started taking it, I started to realize that it just helps with dealing with anxiety and the stress that comes along with everyday life,” she said.

Lindsay, also a mother of three, said she got involved in researching CBD for its anxiety-related benefits.

“For me, when I drink our water, it just makes me have a clear mind. I feel like it’s a weight lifted off of me when I consume our water,” Lindsay said.

SEE ALSO: Retailers struggle to keep popular cannabis extract CBD on shelves in Canada

Pladson, a mother of a two-year-old, said she grew up playing hockey and has inflammation in her joints and back pain.

“That also seemed to clear up. I had a desk job as well, sitting down all of the time caused a lot of issues with my back. CBD helps with all of those issues,” Pladson said.

The product is to launch with four different flavours, and the water is to be mixed with natural terpenes. Terpenes are a class of organic compounds that may provide some benefits.

The women said when you mix CBD with terpenes, you get something called the “entourage effect.”

“Certain natural terpenes, some will help you sleep, some will give you more energy,” Sheck said. “They have different effects and when you combine it with CBD, you get a bonus on top of it. With the different flavours, you’ll get an added bonus with the natural terpenes.”

SEE ALSO: Edibles legalization fraught with hurdles, lack of clarity, companies say

Although CBD-related products are currently available, such as CBD oil capsules through the government-run BC Cannabis Store, the women say educating the public on the difference between THC and CBD remains an important task.

“A lot of people have a total misunderstanding of CBD verses regular marijuana, or THC,” Sheck said.

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