Members of the Freemasons of British Columbia and of the Canadian Cancer Society celebrate their partnership at the new Kordyban Lodge in Prince George.

Members of the Freemasons of British Columbia and of the Canadian Cancer Society celebrate their partnership at the new Kordyban Lodge in Prince George.

Freemasons celebrate 25 years with Canadian Cancer Society

A special ceremony was held at the new Kordyban Lodge in Prince George

A special ceremony was held at the new Kordyban Lodge in Prince George May 4th to commemorate and celebrate the contribution made by the Freemasons of British Columbia to the Canadian Cancer Society.

The  Freemasons’ Most Worshipful Grand Master William R. Cave, from Quesnel, was on hand to celebrate the occasion and give a speech.

“Since 1989, the Freemasons Cancer Car Project has been providing free transportation to thousands of cancer patients in Vancouver, the Interior and on Vancouver Island,” Cave said during the speech.

“Starting with just two vehicles in 1989, The Cancer Car Program has now grown to a fleet of more than 16 vehicles, which provides approximately 35,000 patient–rides each year.”

Now, with the construction of the new cancer clinic and the Canadian Cancer Society’s Kordyban Lodge in Prince George, the Freemasons are committed to extending their volunteer service to those in need in Northern B.C. as well.

Cave went on to explain the extent of the fleet’s accomplishments in the last 22 years.

“Since inception, 12,410,340 kilometres have been driven,” he said.

“That equals 310 trips around the world, or 16.1 trips to the moon and back.”

Cave also emphasized the impact this program has had for people needing the service.

“Six hundred and nine thousand patient trips have been delivered, the same amount of people it would take to fill B.C. Place Stadium 11.28 times.”

Cave explained some of the values which are instilled upon first becoming a Freemason, specifically about the value of charity.

 

“One of the first lessons a Freemason is taught is the importance of charity, although I must add the clarification that charity should not be considered solely from monetary perspective,” he

said.

 

“True charity is an act of caring, an arm about the shoulder, a kind deed in a time of need or a gentle word.”

Cathy Adair, vice president, cancer control, Canadian Cancer Society for BC and Yukon gave many thanks to the Freemasons.

“We are very thankful for all the Freemasons have done for the society,” Adair said.

“Their members volunteer tirelessly and do so much for people with cancer.

“The Freemasons deserve much recognition for all the work they do.”