QJS students preserve happy SPCA adoption stories

Students under the direction of teacher Cathy Burke took the stories of successful SPCA adoptions and preserved them in shadow boxes

Clockwise from left: Amity Dixon-Traer

A couple of years ago I wanted to find a way to write an in memorium for a beautiful adult cat I had adopted from the Penticton SPCA. She led an interesting life when she joined our family; she made a long distance move with us and in general played a big role in our household. I decided to make a story of her life by arranging pictures and a story about her in a shadow box frame. I took this down to the local SPCA, in Quesnel where I now live. It has remained on the wall there for about four years.

As a teacher to middle school students, I see many students with a variety of talents. At Christmas time this year, my Grade 8 class of French Immersion students held a Quebec-themed Christmas celebration. I was amazed by the work they put into these hand-crafted invitations.

I have always supported the SPCA. The work done on these invitations would look wonderful if we were to put together more stories of successful adoptions of animals from the SPCA, I thought. I asked my students if they would be interested in making more scrapbooking projects for the SPCA – they readily agreed. I contacted Colby O’Flynn, manager of the Quesnel SPCA  and told her I would like to showcase my students’ talents and make more story book frames about pets’ lives, either living or passed on. Colby put the call out to our community on Quesnel’s SPCA Facebook page and the response was huge.

All the stories we received were wonderful, about how a pet had found a perfect fit into someone’s home and life. Students were shown the submissions and chose the dog or cat whose story they wanted to tell.

The students had a variety of reasons for choosing various pets to feature in a shadow box.

“I believe it’s important for people to realize that when you take in an animal, it does make a difference,” Jaydagh Billingsley said.

Priya Badhan said she believes these animals are really inspiring because they’ve been through so much and they come out so strong.

Riddhiman Kansal chose a dog named Ginger because the story stood out for him.

He went on to say, “the value of these shadow boxes are important because they tell some great stories.”

Amity Dixon-Traer picked a cat named Lego who only had three legs.

“Lego shows that good things happen to everyone eventually and these stories [shadow boxes] show that there are happy endings,” she said

Abbey Mills chose a dog named Tanner who reminded her of the puppy her family adopted from the SPCA.

As this goes to press, we are still working on stories but will probably not be able to fulfill every submission we receive – or maybe we will?

It all depends on the donation of more shadow-box frames, and how many stories students can produce between now and the end of the school year.

I will have the same group of students in Grade 9 and they may be interested in working on this project into their senior year at QJS.  I am proud to have such fine young members of our community put in the time and effort for a positive cause.

In order to complete our project, we gratefully received assistance for supplies from Walmart in Quesnel, Michaels in Prince George, as well as money donated from Houses 1 and 4 of QJS.

– submitted by Cathy Burke

Just Posted

Quesnel’s program to attract and retain new residents

Susan Paulsen rolls out the red carpet treatment to help new residents adjust

Letter: rural B.C. deserves police resources just as much as Lower Mainland

MLA hopes Minister of Public Safety’s B.C. tour will open his eyes to lack of police resources in region

29 years on: the search for a missing Prince George family continues

Marlene Jack has been searching for information about her sister’s family for 29 years

Emperor’s Challenge conquered by Quesnel queens

Group of nine local women ran up and down Babcock Mountain on Saturday

Some roads in Cariboo region closed due to evacuation orders

The Ministry of Transportation has provided a list of road closures in the Cariboo

‘Queen of Soul’ Aretha Franklin has died

Publicist Gwendolyn Quinn reports Franklin passed Thursday at 9:50 a.m. at her home in Detroit

Williams Lake ESS activiated for possible arrival of wildfire evacuees from west of Prince George

Once Prince George reaches 100 per cent capacity they will be directed to Williams Lake

70 years after Babe Ruth’s death, fans still flock to grave

After Ruth died of throat cancer at age 53, tens of thousands of fans came to pay respects

Airbnb’s federal budget proposal tells Liberals, ‘we want to be regulated’

Submission says ‘we want to be regulated’ and asks the government to avoid forcing existing rules

Greens won’t run candidate in Burnaby South as ‘leader’s courtesy’ to Singh: May

Green Leader Elizabeth May says the decision is an extension of a ‘leader’s courtesy’

Missing B.C. hiker, dog found safe after 3-day search

Cranbrook hiker had been missing since Sunday, August 12, near Jumbo Pass.

UPDATED: B.C. RCMP dismantle Kinder Morgan protest camp

RCMP say they will enforce a court injunction today and remove Trans Mountain pipeline protesters who have been camped outside a Kinder Morgan terminal in Burnaby.

Italy says death toll will mount in Genoa bridge collapse

Authorities worried about the stability of remaining large sections of a partially collapsed bridge evacuated about 630 people from nearby apartments.

Former CIA Director: Trump worked with Russians and now he’s desperate

In an opinion piece in The New York Times, John Brennan cites press reports and Trump’s own goading of Russia during the campaign to find Democrat Hillary Clinton’s missing emails.

Most Read