Catching this bird on camera is a little tricky, but suet seemed to do the trick, says Karen Powell, who photographed this pileated woodpecker on Murphy Street. (Karen Powell - Quesnel Cariboo Observer)

Catching this bird on camera is a little tricky, but suet seemed to do the trick, says Karen Powell, who photographed this pileated woodpecker on Murphy Street. (Karen Powell - Quesnel Cariboo Observer)

Quesnel’s Christmas Bird Count will be Dec. 29

Participants asked to note species of bird, tally highest number birds of each species seen together

The 2019 Quesnel Christmas Bird Count is scheduled for Sunday, Dec. 29.

This is an open community event organized by the Quesnel Birding Club.

“Nine field teams roam the area, tallying the species and individual birds seen or heard,” according to a press release from the club. “You are welcome to join the count as a yard feeder-watcher or as a member of a field team. You might see interesting birds casually while out on count day — we’d love to hear from you!”

Anyone who participates in the Quesnel Christmas Bird Count is asked to note each species they see and tally the highest number of individual birds of each species seen together. For example, if you see three Northern Flicker in the morning and two in the afternoon, your tally is three Northern Flicker, unless you can clearly identify that the afternoon flickers are different from those encountered in the morning, according to the club. A species seen within three days of Dec. 29 but not recorded on count day can be noted as a count week species, though it does not impact the final tally — Sunday, Dec 29 is the all-important day.

Traditional count boundaries are the Cottonwood River to the north, the Kersley rail overpass to the south, 500 Road to the east, and the Quesnel Rod and Gun Club to the west.

“Research shows that the highest diversity of species is attracted to Black-Oil Sunflower Seed,” according to the Quesnel Birding Club. “Suet is also popular. We scout the area and keep detailed notes on hotspot feeders. We have enjoyed an unusual recent influx of Blue Jay, and Steller’s Jay, and even have a few records of Clark’s Nutcracker. Some of you will have noticed Eurasian Collared-Dove and American Goldfinch in your yard.”

People are asked to report their counts to 250-249-5561 or q-birds@xplornet.com.

For local birding news, join the Quesnel Birding Club on Facebook at Q-Birds (Quesnel Birding Club).

READ MORE: Quesnel birder encourages participation in Great Backyard Bird Count



editor@quesnelobserver.com

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