For six years, Andrew Stolz ran on mountain trails in the company of his beloved German Shepherd, Topaz. (Photo submitted)

$1,000 reward offered after B.C. dog dies of strychnine poisoning

Topaz, a German Shepherd, collapsed while out on a run with her owner

An animal welfare group is offering a $1,000 reward after it was confirmed a dog near Creston died of strychnine poisoning.

Andrew Stolz was out for a run up Mount Cowley in late March with a friend and his German Shepherd, Topaz.

The trio came to the crest of a hill, they saw three golden eagles fly off from a what turned out to be a raccoon carcass with its tail cut off further down the bank.

They kept running, until Topaz dropped to the ground.

Her back leg seized in mid-run,” Stolz said. “She collapsed.”

He thought she might be having a stroke, so he sent his friend to go get his truck.

“I carried her, and she was having horrible seizures. I tried to give her water, but she didn’t want it.”

Topaz took her last breath, suffering an “excruciating” death, and he carried her body back down the trail.

READ MORE: Petition to end B.C. ‘wolf-whacking’ contests gains 60,000 signatures

Later that day, Stolz’s friend’s wife, a dog walker, said a dog in her care recently had to be rushed to the vet after eating strychnine-laced meat.

Stolz went back to the raccoon carcass with a conservation officer, and saw two plastic bags of meat nearby – one eaten.

“Some pieces of meat had slipped down on to the road and Topaz must have got some while we were running.”

Lab tests later confirmed strychnine in the meat. Samples were sent for further testing.

“In my investigation, what I saw at the scene is troubling,” said the officer, James Barber. “If this is a poisoning, it will be very hard to find the culprit and we are going to need the public to help with information.”

Stolz wondered if the meat had anything to do with the Creston rod and gun club’s competition to kill wolves and other predators in an effort to protect farmers’ livestock. Some cattle at ranches across B.C. have been decimated by an overpopulation of wolves over the past decade.

The Fur-Bearers, a B.C.-based non-profit group, is offering a $1,000 reward for information that helps to identify and convict whoever is responsible.

“Strychnine is a horrific way for an animal to die, and it is illegal for use in British Columbia,” said spokesperson Michael Howie. “This was a crime that someone committed knowing full well that they would cause suffering to any animal who came ingested the bait.”

Anyone with information is requested to contact the BC Conservation Service at 1-877-952-7277 or Conservation.Officer.Service@gov.bc.ca.


Email typos to
editor@crestonvalleyadvance.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID-19: Rocky Mountaineer to delay season

The popular luxury train has suspended operations through April due to COVID-19

WASHOUT: Slide at Soda Creek MacAlister Road makes road impassable

Next update on DriveBC is expected on Monday, March 30 at noon.

Quesnel’s new Digital Today team ready to offer free digital marketing support to businesses

Digital Today members have taken a 12-week Digital Marketing Bootcamp through Community Futures

Social media a blessing and a curse during time of crisis: B.C. communication expert

‘In moments of crisis, fear is very real and palpable,’ says SFU’s Peter Chow-White

Ranch Musings: COVID-19 and ranching

Columnist David Zirnhelt passes on resources for ranchers

Canada expands 75% wage subsidy to COVID-19 affected businesses of all sizes: Trudeau

Program will provide up to $847 per week for each worker

Cruise ships, one with COVID-19 on board, carry Canadians covertly through Panama Canal

Zaandam, Rotterdam pass through canal under cover of darkness in face of local protests

LifeLabs reducing public hours as it assists with COVID-19 testing

Coronavirus tests not done at B.C. patient centres, referrals only

24,000 Canadian Forces members ready for COVID-19 response: Defence Minister

No direct requests made by premiers yet, national defence minister says

IN DEPTH: How B.C. emptied its hospitals to prepare for COVID-19

Thousands of beds have been freed up, but patients and seniors have had to sacrifice

‘Nothing concrete’: Tenants, landlords lack details after B.C. unveils COVID-19 rental aid

Single mom in Golden says she’s already going to the food bank after being laid off

B.C. is seeing the highest rate of COVID-19 recovery in Canada, and there’s a few reasons why

British Columbia was one of the first to see rise in COVID-19 cases, and has also switched up testing

World COVID-19 morning update: Olympics delayed one year; 12,000 health care workers infected

Comprehensive world news update: Lockdown in UK showing signs of hope

Most Read