53 B.C. daycares move to $10-a-day pilot

Roughly 2,500 parents who are existing clients will now pay a maximum of $200 per month

The B.C. government is moving 53 daycares across the province to the $10-a-day model as it tests the NDP government’s promise of universal childcare.

Roughly 2,500 parents who are those daycares’ existing clients will now pay a maximum of $200 per month, Minister of State for Childcare Katrina Chen told reporters in Vancouver.

Operators will be receiving government funding to cover their operational and administration costs, and in return give feedback to the province as it works towards province-wide implementation in the future, Chen said.

“Prototype sites give us a glimpse of what the future of universal childcare in B.C. can be, and are critical as we design and refine our program moving forward,” she added.

READ MORE: B.C. to create 3,800 childcare spaces within two years

READ MORE: Affordable daycare left out of NDP budget disappoints advocate

The program began earlier this month, funded through a $60-million investment from the federal government.

The daycares taking part were selected based on more than 300 applications sent in June.

The pilot will run until the end of March 2020.

Parents who won’t have access to the low-cost sites can still apply for funds through the provincial childcare benefit.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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