Provincial education minister Rob Fleming (right), here seen during Thursday’s official opening of a new playground at Sidney Elementary School with Dave Eberwein, superintendent of schools for School District No. 62 and local MLA Adam Olsen, could not give a date when public teachers and their employers would reach a settlement (Wolf Depner/News Staff)

B.C. education minister defends NDP actions as teachers remain without contract

Rob Fleming made the comment in Sidney after opening a play ground

Provincial education minister Rob Fleming said his party “absolutely” remains a friend of teachers, but could not give a firm date when contract talks with teachers would lead to a settlement.

“As I have said previously, we will stay at it as long as it takes to get an agreement,” he said. “We have done that now with 225,000 other public servants, most recently with ambulance-paramedics. We continue to conclude agreements with bargaining units throughout the public service, many of them in tough, front-line positions. I know teaching is a very difficult position from [the perspective] of our government and we want to reach an agreement with them, just as we have nurses and other professions in B.C.”

Fleming made these comments after speaking to reporters in Sidney after officially opening a new playground at Sidney Elementary School.

RELATED: Sidney students, provincial education minister zip into new school playground

The agreement between the British Columbia Teachers Federation (BCFT) and the B.C. Public School Employers’ Association (BCPSEA) expired on June 30. Teachers returned to classrooms without an agreement with a mediator trying to resolve the impasse.

“With respect to the mediator, there are few details that I wish to comment on, because they have called on both parties to adhere to a black out,” he said. “We are very hopeful that we continue to have productive conversations that will lead to a settlement.”

With the current labour situation, the New Democrats find themselves in a position of having to negotiate with a group — public education teachers — which it has historically courted.

“Absolutely,” said Fleming, when asked whether New Democrats still remain friends of teachers. “I think our funding record shows that — $1 billion of new resources in the school system. British Columbia hasn’t seen this in decades.”

British Columbia, he said, is making progress. “You can’t fix 16 years overnight, but we have turned the corner,” he said.

Fleming also commented on educational assistants (EAs) after two View Royal Elementary parents had expressed concerns about the level of care for their children, both on the autism spectrum. They’re well-behaved, aren’t boisterous in the classroom, but they require extra attention from educational assistants.

RELATED: ‘This is unacceptable’: View Royal parents frustrated over lack of resources for students

“Sometimes he gets shuffled between four to five EAs a day,” said Cristina Gage, one of the mothers.

Fleming said that it is a real concern for him, because the provincial education is inclusive.

“I can well understand that a parent may have if their child is not able to participate on a daily basis in the school,” he said. “It is not for a lack of resources. Our government has increased special education funding by 23 per cent since we formed government two years ago. That is a $106 million additional dollars to school districts to be able to hire educational assistants, to be able to provide special education teachers and other supports in the classroom.”



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com

Just Posted

Royal Canadian Air Force members to conduct ‘nocturnal training’ in the Chilcotin next week

Public may see a Buffalo aircraft, flares and search and rescue parachuting in orange jumpsuits

PHOTOS: Sun shines for final outdoor Quesnel Farmers Market

Next up are Christmas Markets Nov. 30, Dec. 7 and Dec. 14

Spooky town tours, new zombie apocalypse challenge part of Barkerville’s Ghostly Halloween event

Several Barkerville merchants are open for trick or treating Oct. 26 and 27

Roos stomp Stamps in 6-5 nailbiter

Win improves the Quesnel squad to 2-3 to start CIHL season

Over 3,000 customers lose power

High winds to blame for Quesnel outages on Tuesday morning

Raptors Bling: NBA champions receive their rings in pre-game ceremony

There are over 650 diamonds — at a weight of 14 carats — in the 14-karat yellow gold ring

‘Find Trevor’: B.C. man’s dog leads searchers to rescue him after fall during hike

‘I’ve had lots of intelligent dogs, but Purple is in a class herself’

15 Canadian youths to sue Ottawa for not acting on climate change

They say young people will be more affected than other groups

Faster response may have prevented fatal outcome at B.C. trampoline park

Coroner’s report rules Greater Victoria father Jay Greenwood’s death accidental

100-pound pumpkin stolen a second time from B.C. business

According to security footage, a man and woman took the pumpkin on Oct. 20 at 8:20 p.m.

Greta Thunberg declines invitation to Victoria due to time, not ferry emissions

Thunberg confirmed that she will be joining a climate strike at the Vancouver Art Gallery on Friday

‘Havoc and chaos:’ Alberta separatist group gains support as Liberals re-elected

The idea is getting interest from people in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and parts of British Columbia

Feds decriminalizing drugs possible if Jagmeet Singh pushes for it, expert says

National pharmacare was one of Singh’s most highly-touted platform policies

In the news: Wexit, Brexit and Trump sparks outrage

There’s been a surge of support for an Alberta separatist group

Most Read