Travellers are seen at Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, B.C. Friday, March 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. police have had to visit 500 travellers who didn’t respond to self-isolation check-ins

More than 14,500 people have returned to B.C. since April 15, by air travel or at land borders

Police have had to follow up with house visits to 500 travellers for evading calls from B.C. officials checking in to make sure they are self-isolating as per provincial and federal orders.

According to North Delta MLA Ravi Kahlon, more than 14,500 people have returned to B.C. since April 15 – either by arriving at Vancouver International Airport or through various land borders.

Of those, 96 people are currently in quarantine at nearby hotels, Kahlon said on Wednesday (April 29). Twenty-six people have developed symptoms related to COVID-19.

Amid a growing number of community transmissions of the novel coronavirus in B.C., the province announced on April 8 that all incoming travellers would need to have a written self-isolation plan prepared which would be presented to border security staff.

If the plan was not suitable or met standards set out by health officials, the travellers would be placed under mandatory quarantine at hotels provided by the federal government.

Ministerial staff have made 8,900 follow-up calls to check in on travellers with plans that allowed them to return to their own homes to self isolate for the necessary 14 days.

During a Tuesday news conference, Premier John Horgan said a majority of travellers are arriving with a plan.

“They were approved by the federal and provincial governments and they went about their business, spent their two weeks in self-isolation and now can continue limited interactions with the broader community,” he said.

The RCMP has been tasked Public Health Agency of Canada to help enforce the Quarantine Act Order, which was declared by the federal Health Minister Patty Hadju on March 25.

Those who violate the order face fines up to $750,000 and six months in prison, while “willfully or recklessly contravening this Act or the regulations could be liable for a fine of up to $1,000,000 or imprisonment of up to three years, or to both,” the RCMP warned.

Police said that arrests would be a last resort “based on the circumstances and the officer’s risk assessment.” Instead, the officer can issue those charged with a notice or summons requiring them to appear in court.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Coronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities

Many don’t have access required to utilize online platforms, says First Nations Technology Council

Quesnel School District announces principal, vice-principal appointments

Joelle Withey has been appointed to the position of vice-principal at QJSS

Quesnel City Hall to reopen June 1

The City is requesting residents limit unnecessary visitation at this time

Bear calls keeping new Cariboo conservation officer busy

Residents are reminded to secure attractants in Williams Lake and Quesnel

Mining Month: A celebration of dedication and resiliency

May is Mining Month, as proclaimed by the Province of B.C.

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

COVID-19: B.C. too dependent on foreign food production workers

New B.C. job site links unemployed with farm, seafood work

B.C. businesses ‘can’t shoulder burden’ of COVID-19 sick pay

Trudeau’s plan should be tied to federal emergency aid

Another Asian giant ‘murder hornet’ found in Lower Mainland

This is the farthest east the invasive species has been found so far

B.C. girl left temporarily paralyzed by tick bite sparks warning from family

Mom says parents need to check their kids when they go camping

PHOTOS: Loved ones reunite at an oasis on closed U.S.-Canada border in Surrey

Officials closed the park in mid-March over coronavirus concerns

Feds delay national action plan for missing and murdered Indigenous women

Meanwhile, the pandemic has exacerbated the violence facing many Indigenous women and girls

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

COLUMN: Canada needs to remember rural communities as thoughts turn to pandemic recovery

Small towns often rely on tourism, which has been decimated by COVID-19

Most Read