Constables Dion Birtwistle and Markus Lueder took the stand Wednesday during the fourth week of the double murder trial for Oak Bay father Andrew Berry. (Keri Coles/News Staff)

Constables Dion Birtwistle and Markus Lueder took the stand Wednesday during the fourth week of the double murder trial for Oak Bay father Andrew Berry. (Keri Coles/News Staff)

Berry sisters murder trial: defence draws comparison to unsolved Vancouver Island slashing

Woman attacked in her home less than a kilometre away from Andrew Berry’s apartment

WARNING: This story contains disturbing details and graphic content.

The jury for the Supreme Court double murder trial of the Oak Bay father accused of killing his two young daughters on Christmas Day 2017, heard from two police constables Wednesday during the fourth week of the trial.

Constable Dion Birtwistle was first to take the stand. He testified that he arrived shortly after 6 p.m. on Christmas Day to Andrew Berry’s Beach Drive apartment, where Berry’s young daughters, four-year-old Aubrey and six-year-old Chloe were found dead and Berry was found seriously injured.

RELATED: Court hears paramedic feared for safety of first responders at Oak Bay murder scene

Birstwistle explained that part of his role that day was to get the unit numbers of the first ambulance attendants on scene so investigators could follow up with them.

He was also tasked with speaking to residents to get pertinent information about what had happened at the apartment.

In a task report, it was noted that one resident, Graham Bell, mentioned he saw two women earlier in the day looking into the windows of Berry’s apartment.

“The women did not appear to be distressed, but more trying to get the attention of whoever was inside,” said co-defence counsel Ben Lynskey, asking Birstwistle to confirm the resident’s statement in the report.

READ ALSO: Oak Bay Sgt. struggles through emotional testimony in double murder trial

At one point while at the apartment, Birstwistle went into the back parking lot to look for Andrew Berry’s car.

“I was unsure whether or not we had an outstanding vehicle that may have another victim in it or another scene or whether or not it had been removed,” said Birtwistle. “We were told on route that there were multiple victims in the suite.”

Consulting his notes from the night, Birtwistle testified that when he arrived on scene other police members were inside the apartment building and a male Oak Bay police officer in the doorway to Berry’s apartment said there was a male in the bedroom who may still have a knife.

Oak Bay Const. Markus Lueder took the stand next, testifying that he arrived at the Oak Bay Police Department at 7:40 p.m. on Christmas Day 2017. While not on shift, he had been called in by Oak Bay Sgt. Angus Wagnell.

“I was called at home on Christmas Day by Sgt.Wagnell who told me there had been a murder of two young sisters in Oak Bay and their father was injured and he asked if I could come and assist at the Oak Bay Police Department,” testified Lueder.

He described attending the apartment building during the days following the crime to provide assistance with scene containment. One of those jobs was to prevent foot traffic around Berry’s bedroom windows. The area was cordoned off with police tape.

“They did not want anybody looking into those windows,” said Lueder.

READ ALSO: Juror dismissed from Andrew Berry double murder trial

During cross-examination, defence counsel Kevin McCullough asked if Lueder had done scene containment previously.

“Particularly I want you to think about April 25, 2017. You know what I’m talking about right?” McCullough asked Lueder.

“Yes. The incident on the Esplanade,” said Lueder.

“That was a stabbing, an attack, of a woman in her home, where she was stabbed and slashed,” said McCullough, noting that is was less than a kilometer away from Andrew Berry’s apartment and similarly along the water.

“That’s correct,” said Lueder.

“We know that nobody has been arrested or charged for it, right?” said McCullough.

Lueder confirmed that the investigation is still ongoing.

RELATED: ‘Horrific attack’ in Oak Bay remains a mystery

When asked if he had, at any point, gone into Andrew Berry’s apartment, Lueder said he had not.

“Did you go in for a peek?” asked McCullough. Lueder confirmed he had not entered the unit and said he didn’t want to “see a peek.”

“You never saw any of the blood in the apartment, or the bodies or anything like that. Is that right?” asked McCullough. “You weren’t traumatized.”

“The reason they didn’t want foot traffic by those windows is because there was a thought that people could see inside the windows. There are blinds on the windows so if you are looking from a distance you couldn’t see a thing,” said Lueder. “I did look inside, real brief, to see if that was actually true, if you could look into the windows and into the room or not. I did see blood and I saw some blond hair. I turned my head, ‘I don’t need to see this.’”

Defence questioned Lueder about something he wrote in his notebook: murder suicide attempt. McCullough asked who told Lueder it was a murder suicide.

While he couldn’t remember who told him, it was framed as “likely what we were dealing with,” but Lueder stressed that it was not a conclusion.

McCullough spent an extensive amount of time questioning Lueder about who assigned him to go to the hospital to stay with Andrew Berry on the night of Dec. 25.

Lueder repeatedly responded that he could not remember who sent him. He became visibly exasperated when the same question continued to be asked over and over.

At 11 p.m. on Christmas Day, Deputy Chief Ray Bernoties called Lueder and directed him to leave the operating room area where Berry was receiving medical attention, making sure to have no contact with Berry, and told him to come back to the station.

Lueder expressed to a nurse at the hospital concerns that Berry might attempt to commit suicide in the hospital. He expressed the same thing to Detective Kathleen Murphy of the Vancouver Island Integrated Major Crime Unit who he saw on his way out of the hospital that night.

“You didn’t express to a nurse or anyone at the hospital that there was an ongoing police investigation and Berry was a victim of an attack?” asked McCullough.

“I did not discuss any particulars of that file at the hospital,” said Lueder.

Court resumes 10 a.m. Thursday.


 

keri.coles@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Arthur Topham has been sentenced to one month of house arrest and three years of probation after breaching the terms of his probation. Topham was convicted of promoting hate against Jewish people in 2015. (Photo submitted)
Quesnel man convicted for anti-Semitic website sentenced to house arrest for probation breach

Arthur Topham was convicted of breaching probation following his 2017 sentence for promoting hatred

A planned ‘deck the big rigs’ light display is cancelled due to COVID-19 related public health orders. (Black Press File Photo)
Quesnel’s outdoor Tour of Lights cancelled due to COVID-19

Updated public health orders from the province mean stopping all events — even if they’re outdoors

An example of the Quesnel Downtown Association’s new branding. (Downtown Quesnel Facebook Photo)
Quesnel Downtown Association requests two-year bylaw renewal

The BIA is also requesting boundary changes to bring in more businesses

Quesnel council agreed to enter into a five-year lease with Kismet Management Ltd. for 1.56 hectares of land at the Quesnel Regional Airport during the Nov. 24 council meeting. (City of Quesnel Photo)
Quesnel council approves new lease agreement for airport lands

The five-year lease with Kismet Management Ltd. would generate additional revenue for the city

A helicopter made its way through the clouds to rescue a stranded snowmobiler on Yanks Peak. (Facebook Video Screenshot)
Quesnel Search and Rescue praises public help in latest search

Gerald Schut said the public didn’t disturb the search area until given direction from SAR teams

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry update the COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature, Nov. 23, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. sets another COVID-19 record with 887 new cases

Another 13 deaths, ties the highest three days ago

Langley School District's board office. (Langley Advance Times files)
‘Sick Out’ aims to pressure B.C. schools over masks, class sizes

Parents from Langley and Surrey are worried about COVID safety in classrooms

The baby boy born to Gillian and Dave McIntosh of Abbotsford was released from hospital on Wednesday (Nov. 25) while Gillian continues to fight for her life after being diagnosed with COVID-19.
B.C. mom with COVID-19 still fighting for life while newborn baby now at home

Son was delivered Nov. 10 while Gillian McIntosh was in an induced coma

B.C. Premier John Horgan, a Star Trek fan, can’t resist a Vulcan salute as he takes the oath of office for a second term in Victoria, Nov. 26, 2020. (B.C. government)
Horgan names 20-member cabinet with same pandemic team

New faces in education, finance, economic recovery

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

The corporate headquarters of Pfizer Canada are seen in Montreal, Monday, Nov. 9, 2020. The chief medical adviser at Health Canada says Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine could be approved in Canada next month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Health Canada expects first COVID-19 vaccine to be approved next month

Canada has a purchase deal to buy at least 20 million doses of Pfizer’s vaccine,

FILE – A paramedic holds a test tube containing a blood sample during an antibody testing program at the Hollymore Ambulance Hub, in Birmingham, England, on Friday, June 5, 2020. (Simon Dawson/Pool via AP)
Want to know if you’ve had COVID-19? LifeLabs is offering an antibody test

Test costs $75 and is available in B.C. and Ontario

The grey region of this chart shows the growth of untraced infection, due to lack of information on potential sources. With added staff and reorganization, the gap is stabilized, Dr. Bonnie Henry says. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C. adjusts COVID-19 tracing to keep up with surging cases

People now notified of test results by text message

Most Read