Royal BC Museum CEO Jack Lohman is stepping down effective Feb. 12. (Don Denton/News Staff)

Royal BC Museum CEO Jack Lohman is stepping down effective Feb. 12. (Don Denton/News Staff)

CEO steps down following allegations of systemic racism at Royal BC Museum

Conversation around racism sparked by resignation of Indigenous collections head in summer 2020

Following months of allegations of racism and a toxic work environment and recent internal survey results deemed “not good,” the CEO of the Royal BC Museum has announced he is stepping down.

In a statement Tuesday, the museum said CEO Jack Lohman and the board of directors mutually decided on the move as the museum “addresses current internal issues.”

Those issues stem from summer 2020 when the then head of Indigenous collections and repatriation, Lucy Bell, announced her resignation with a speech calling out the museum on issues of racism and a lack of diversity. This spurred an internal investigation and the hiring of diversity inclusion consultant Alden Habacon to conduct training, interviews and a staff survey.

RELATED: Royal BC Museum faces allegations of systemic racism, toxic work environment

In January, the results of the race and discrimination survey came in and, although not made public, were called “not good” by the museum’s board chair, Dan Muzyka. Speaking with Black Press Media last month, he said the museum had begun restructuring at the executive level and developing a comprehensive training program for executives and staff.

After nearly a decade at the museum, Lohman’s departure is effective Feb. 12. Until the museum recruits a new CEO, Muzyka will be serving in the position.

-With files from Nina Grossman

RELATED: Repatriation efforts work to heal and connect through history: Royal BC Museum


 

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