The City of Quesnel is applying for grant funding to replace the Dragon Hill Reservoir, which staff says will improve overall water quality. (Photo courtesy of City of Quesnel)

The City of Quesnel is applying for grant funding to replace the Dragon Hill Reservoir, which staff says will improve overall water quality. (Photo courtesy of City of Quesnel)

City of Quesnel seeking grant to replace water reservoir

A new Dragon Hill Reservoir will improve overall water quality, according to City staff

The City of Quesnel is looking to replace one of its water reservoirs.

The City of Quesnel is submitting an application for grant funding through the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program-British Columbia-Rural and Northern Communities Infrastructure intake to replace the Dragon Hill Reservoir.

“Of the six City reservoirs in use, the Dragon Hill Reservoir is in the poorest condition, due for replacement, and identified in the five-year Capital Plan,” Chris Coben, the City’s director of capital works and infrastructure, said at the Oct. 20 council meeting.

A thorough inspection of the reservoirs and report was completed in 2009 as the City’s reservoirs began to show their age, according to Coben’s report to council.

“In 2013, a structural engineer inspected and evaluated all of the City reservoirs,” he wrote. “Repair recommendations were made, and this work was completed; however, due to the reservoir no longer being water tight, it has continued to deteriorate.”

This reservoir was constructed in the 1980s, and Coben says a concrete reservoir generally has an average lifespan of 30 to 50 years.

“From a water supply and quality perspective, a more appropriately designed and sized reservoir will improve water temperature and turnover mixing, therefore improving overall water quality,” wrote Coben. “Additionally, fire flows and system pressure to Sword Avenue, Carson Pit Road and all of North Star Road will be improved from the current status.”

The estimated cost of this project, based on preliminary design, is $1,786,000 — with 50 per cent coming from the federal government, 40 per cent coming from the provincial government and 10 per cent coming from the municipal government.

At the Oct. 20 meeting, council committed to its share of the project, as well as cost overruns, with $178,600 of the City’s portion of funds being drawn from the City of Quesnel Water Capital Fund Reserve.

“This would be a nice one for us to get if we can get funding for something that critical,” said Mayor Bob Simpson.

READ MORE: City of Quesnel looking into new water treatment options for dealing with manganese



editor@quesnelobserver.com

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