Cutting Sea to Sky Gondola cable could have ‘seriously hurt or killed’ someone: report

‘Cutting the haul rope was an extremely dangerous act’

The haul rope on the Sea to Sky Gondola outside Vancouver was deliberately cut, according to a Technical Safety BC report released Wednesday.

The technical investigation report says there were no defects with the haul rope or its design that contributed to the collapse of approximately 30 gondola cabins on Aug. 10 in Squamish.

“Our technical failure analysis has concluded that the haul rope wires were substantially cut while under tension,” said Jeff Coleman, director of risk and safety knowledge.

“Once a sufficient number of wire strands had been cut, the remaining rope segment yielded under the tension from the non-operating gondola.”

As a result, the gondola cabins fell to the ground and many were damaged beyond repair.

READ MORE: Sea-to-Sky Gondola in B.C. likely out of commission until 2020

Coleman said cutting the haul rope was “an extremely dangerous act.”

“The resulting tension overload that caused many of the individual steel wires and the rope to snap while being cut could have resulted in serious injury or even death to those involved,” he said.

“Anyone close to the gondola when this occurred could have been seriously hurt or killed.”

READ MORE: Cut gondola cable and damaged cars to cost millions, Squamish company says

President and CEO Catherine Roome said the independent, self-funded organization is now working closely with RCMP to support their ongoing criminal investigation.

Anyone with information regarding this crime is asked to call the RCMP’s dedicated tip line at 604-892-6122.

To provide a tip anonymously, call BC Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.

READ MORE: Sea to Sky Gondola cable may have been cut deliberately — Squamish RCMP



karissa.gall@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

‘An extra $220 every 90 days’: B.C. patients pay more dispensing fees due to prescription limits

The Kelowna woman says it’s outrageous to charge for refills every 30 days

Forestry Ink: Introduced, not invasive species

Columnist Jim Hilton writes about animals that are considered invasive

Quesnel businesses can apply for 2020 façade improvement grants

In 2019, the City helped five businesses through the Northern Development Initiative Trust program

Ranch Musings: Our mental health and well-being in these times

Columnist David Zirnhelt writes about ranching during the COVID-19 pandemic

‘Hold our line’: 29 new cases of COVID-19 announced in B.C.

Saturday’s number of new cases marks the lowest in weeks.

Two inmates found positive for COVID-19 at federal prison in B.C.; other tests pending

15 staff self-isolating waiting results, refusal to work notice sent, says correctional officer

Critic, workers’ group ‘disappointed’ Trudeau chose Amazon to distribute PPE

Amazon Canada said in an email to The Canadian Press that it is working with Canada Post, Purolator

How to cope with your mental health during a global pandemic

Becca Shears, clinical counsellor in Vanderhoof speaks about ways to deal with stress and anxiety during this time.

Full World COVID-19 update: National Guard collect ventilators in New York; Spain, Italy improve

Comprehensive coronavirus update with news from around the world.

Two people fined after B.C. police spot online ads re-selling 5,000 surgical, N95 masks

Police confiscated the masks, being sold at inflated prices, and now working with Fraser Health

Sex workers face new risks during COVID-19 pandemic

‘Desperation has kicked in’ for vulnerable, undocumented workers unable to access help

Unclear if Cowichan couple refusing to self-isolate will face penalty

No fines or charges have been laid to date, including Cowichan couple who won’t self isolate

Most Read