Electrofishing nets close to 7,000 goldfish

Warmer waters meant the wrapping up of electrofishing on Dragon Lake last week.

  • May. 5, 2016 4:00 p.m.

A goldfish is scooped up after a current is passed through the waters of Dragon Lake.

AUTUMN MacDONALD

Observer Reporter

Warmer waters meant the wrapping up of electrofishing on Dragon Lake last week.

Baker Creek Enhancement Society (BCES), along with volunteers and Fisheries went out a total of five times since the ice melted, removing 6,850 goldfish from the thick reeds along the shore.

“The goldfish ranged in size from two inches to eight inches,” BCES Executive Director Tracy Bond said.

“We have no idea how many more there are.”

Bond said the conditions of the lake determine when and where the goldfish congregate.

Electrofishing uses a current of electricity. There’s a wand out front with “rat tail back” charging a six-foot radius. Different frequencies can be used with one shocking and killing the fish and one stunning fish for transportation or scientific surveys.

A faint clicking sound greets me as I arrive on site. Through the budding trees and brown reeds I spot two men in dark grey waders, one with the device, the other a net.

Bond stands slightly to their left with a bucket.

Once the clicking stops, the wand pierces the choppy, muddy water – a flurry of activity rushes the surface, the net plunges in scooping up dozens of the fish.

I’m handed my own pair of waders and a net.

Oh boy.

I sludge my way to their location, relying heavily on Bond’s shoulder for support. Several times my foot suctions to the bottom. I have visions of taking a header in

the reeds and feel a

slight tightening of my chest.

Get it together Autumn.

He dips his wand, the fish rush up, the net dips in and they’re transferred to the bucket.

“Can you grab that one for us?” he asks, pointing to a wayward goldfish the size of my hand.

I reach my net out, scoop up my catch and gingerly move my net towards the bucket.

It twitches.

I scream.

I then gag… more than once.

They laugh – a lot.

“We have had complaints about the process,” Bond said, noting strict permit regulations does not allow relocation or sale.

“Our permit was for disposal only.”

But Bond hopes the disposal of the goldfish at Crooked Leg Ranch for food might help alleviate the concerns of residents.

“All of this could have been prevented if people hadn’t dumped their family goldfish,” she said.

“And all of our efforts now are simply buying time… not solving the problem.”

 

Just Posted

One man in hospital after crash on Two Mile Flat

The driver went down a steep bank along Highway 97

Go see A Charlie Brown Christmas Dec. 16-17

The free production will be at Northstar Church this Sunday and Monday

Bouchie Lake Fire Department responds to shed fire on Milburn Lake Road

The shed, which housed a wood stove, burned to the ground

Construction on schedule for CNC Quesnel trades wing expansion

$5 million expansion project should be completed by May 2019

Guy Smith sentenced for manslaughter, dismemberment of Likely resident Gary Price

Smith, 58, will spend five and half more years in prison, above time served

VIDEO: Royals reveal the images on their Christmas cards

Prince William and his wife Kate are shown outside in casual clothes, their three young children in tow

ICBC to apply for 6.3% hike to basic insurance rates

Crown Corporation said it will be submitting its next basic rate application to the British Columbia Utilities Commission Friday

Canfor Corp. extending temporary curtailment of sawmills in B.C.; cutting hours

Vancouver-based company says the decision is due to declining lumber prices, high log costs and log supply constraints

Canada’s prospective world junior team members await final roster decisions

Thirty-four players were invited to the national junior selection camp

Family searching for B.C. professor last seen at Colombian salsa club

Ramazan Gencay, a professor in economics at Simon Fraser University, was last seen in Medellin

Rash of bomb threats a learning opportunity for response capacity, Goodale

Thursday’s wave of bomb threats swept across communities on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border

Mike Duffy can’t sue Senate over suspension without pay, judge rules

Duffy’s lawsuit sought more than $7.8 million from the upper chamber

Language on Sikh extremism in report will be reviewed, Goodale says

A public-safety ministry document indicats terrorist threats to Canada included a section on Sikh extremism for the first time

Questions raised over retailers who shame shoplifters with photos

Alleged theft from a sex shop in Newfoundland led to posts on social media

Most Read