Chief Joe Alphonse (left), Tsilhqot’in National Government Chair and Chief of the Tl’etinqox Government, and Lhtako Dene Nation Chief Clifford Lebrun share a laugh as they sign the Interim Letter of Understanding for Boundary Discussions Jan. 11 at the Quesnel and District Seniors Centre. Alphonse and Lebrun are two of 10 signatories representing the Southern Dakelh Nation Alliance and the Tsilhqot’in Nation. Lindsay Chung photo

Members of Southern Dakelh Nation Alliance and Tsilhqot’in Nation commit to working together to resolve boundary issues

First Nations chiefs sign Letter of Understanding and agree to continue engaging at a Nation-to-Nation level

Lindsay Chung

Observer Staff

Working together and moving forward were two key themes that kept emerging as members of the Southern Dakelh Nation Alliance (SDNA) and Tsilhqot’in Nation gathered in Quesnel to strengthen their relationship by signing a Letter of Understanding.

The SDNA and Tsilhqot’in Nation signed an Interim Letter of Understanding (LOU) for Boundary Discussions Jan. 11 at the Quesnel and District Seniors Centre.

The SDNA was represented by the Lhtako Dené Nation, Nazko First Nation, Lhoosk’uz Dené Nation and Ulkatcho Nation, while the Tsilhqot’in Nation was represented by the Xeni Gwet’in First Nations Government, Yunesit’in Government, Tl’etinqox Government, ?Esdilagh First Nation, Tsideldel First Nation, Toosey Indian Band (Tl’esqox) and the Tsilhqot’in National Government (TNG).

“It’s great to have a formal agreement to work together,” says Chief Percy Guichon of the Tsideldel First Nation. “It’s a very important step, I think, for creating stronger, healthier communities, and it is going to make us stronger.”

At the Jan. 11 LOU signing ceremony, Shawn Holte, who is the SDNA’s executive director/lead negotiator and a member of the Ulkatcho Nation, explained the ceremony was an important celebration of working together.

“We have to find a way to come together,” he told those gathered to witness the signing. “Yes, sometimes we have to agree to disagree, but at the other end of it, there is something better.”

Recognizing and valuing the “enduring relationship” between the nations and their “proud history as neighbours,” the LOUstates: “the SDNA and Tsilhqot’in Nation recognize the overlap between our territories and are committed to working to resolve boundary issues as a priority.”

The SDNA and Tsilhqot’in Nation entered a Memorandum of Understanding on May 11, 2017, to commit to working together as neighbours to resolve boundary issues associated with the Nenqay Deni Accord through the establishment of a Technical Table, according to the LOU.

“As Southern Dakelh and Tsilhqot’in peoples, we value our relationship and the ties that bind us as neighbours, and we wish to continue engaging at a Nation-to-Nation level to resolve boundary issues between us in a good and positive way, and the Nations wish to demonstrate our progress and commitment to this work,” states the LOU.

By signing this LOU, the SDNA and Tsilhqot’in Nation agree to recognize the efforts that have been undertaken so far to address he boundary issues and agree to support the “Principles to Resolve Boundary Issues.” The nations also commit to continuing efforts to resolve boundary issues “in a positive way through the work the Technical Table” and commit to seeking a lasting resolution to boundary issues.

As an interim measure, the nations agree too establish a buffer area around the Indian Reserve Lands of each individual member community, known as “community areas.” The community areas will be developed through community-to-community engagement and/or protocol, according to the LOU.

Chief Clifford Lebrun of the Lhtako Dené Nation says when he first spoke to their Elders about an alliance with Southern Dakelh nations and working with the Tsilhgot’in Nation, he often heard one thing: “it’s about time.”

“One thing I noticed with all our discussions at the head tables is the discussions started with a boundary between us, and I think we’ve evolved to not a boundary between us but one around us,” says Lebrun. “I’m very proud. It’s been a lot of work.”

Chief Russell Myers Ross, of the Yunesit’in Government, who is the TNG Tribal Vice-Chair, spoke positively about the process and what the LOU represents.

“I think at the base of it, as long as we have these core values of respect and honesty, I think we can move forward,” he says. “I feel good about this process and signing the Letter of Understanding.”

Chief Betty Cahoose of the Ulkatcho Nation shared a bit of her family history to illustrate how the nations are all connected in some way or other.

“This really brings me back to when we formed the Southern Dakelh Nation Alliance,” she said. “Our nation said it’s about time we come together and work together. My nation and my community are very happy that we are coming together and doing this good work. I’m really optimistic that things are going to improve between the nations.”

READ MORE: Trudeau exonerates hanged war chiefs of 1864 on B.C. Tsilhqot’in title lands

Just Posted

Category 2 open burning to be allowed in Cariboo

Restrictions on Category 2 open burning will be lifted June 26 at noon

Community members raise concerns at packed forestry meeting in Quesnel

North Cariboo MLA Coralee Oakes hopes community feels heard

Quesnel SkyFest offering Canada Day sale this weekend

Online tickets will be 10 per cent off during the long weekend

Quesnel RCMP welcomes new officer

Reserve Constable Cam Percy will begin working part-time in the fall

Molly’s Comedy Cabaret kicks off busy long weekend at Sunset Theatre in Wells

Theatre also showing The Fred Wells Show and premiere of One Man Avengers

VIDEO: Clip of driver speeding past B.C. school bus alarms MLA

Laurie Throness of Chilliwack-Kent says he will lobby for better safety measures

Olympic skier from B.C. suing Alpine Canada after coach’s sex offences

Bertrand Charest was convicted in 2017 on 37 charges

B.C. senior’s car vandalized for more than 18 months

Retired RCMP officer determined to catch ‘tagger.’

VIDEO: Driver doing laps in busy Vancouver intersections nets charges

Toyota Camry spotted doing laps in intersection, driving towards pedestrians

Former Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo to retire

‘Bobby Lou’ calls it a career after 19 NHL seasons

Man charged in crash that killed B.C. pregnant woman

Frank Tessman charged for 2018 Highway 1 accident where Kelowna elementary school teacher died

Province unveils 10-year plan to boost mental health, addiction recovery services

The plan, called A Pathway to Hope, focuses on early-intervention services that are seeing high demand

Rock slide in B.C. river may hinder salmon passage

DFO says it is aware that the slide occurred in a narrow portion of the Fraser River

Most Read