In this Nov. 6, 2017 photo, Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, leaves the federal courthouse in Washington. Manafort has sued special counsel Robert Mueller saying he exceeded authority in the Russia probe. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Former Trump aide Paul Manafort found guilty of eight charges

A mistrial has been declared for the other 10 charges against him

Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman for U.S. President Donald Trump, has been found guilty of eight charges in his financial fraud trial.

A mistrial has been declared for the other 10 charges against him.

READ MORE: Judge sends Trump’s ex-campaign chair Paul Manafort to jail

READ MORE: What does Mueller have? Manafort trial offers glimpse

READ MORE: Cross-examination focuses on Manafort protege’s own crimes

More to come.

The Latest on the Paul Manafort trial:

4:40 p.m.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has been found guilty of eight financial crime charges in the first trial victory for special counsel Robert Mueller’s team.

A judge declared a mistrial on 10 other counts after jurors failed to reach a unanimous verdict.

The jury deliberated for four days before announcing the verdict at the federal courthouse in Alexandria, Virginia.

Prosecutors spent more than two weeks presenting their case as they sought to prove Manafort concealed millions of dollars in offshore accounts from the IRS.

__

4:25 p.m.

The jury in the financial fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort says it’s reached a verdict on eight counts but is undecided on the remaining 10.

Jurors made that announcement in a note Tuesday afternoon to the federal jury overseeing the trial.

The jury is in its fourth day of deliberations and had signalled earlier in the day that it was stuck on at least one count.

U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III encouraged jurors to continue deliberations, and suggested he was not ready to consider a partial verdict.

__

4:15 p.m.

The jury in the Paul Manafort financial fraud trial has submitted a new note to the judge.

That’s according to the office of special counsel Robert Mueller, whose office is prosecuting the former Trump campaign chairman.

The jury earlier Tuesday suggested it was stuck on at least one of the 18 counts against Manafort. Jurors asked what they should do if they could not agree on one of the counts in the indictment.

U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III encouraged the panel to continue deliberating.

This is the fourth day of deliberations for the federal jury in Alexandria, Virginia.

__

11:45 a.m.

The jury in the financial fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort wants to know what to do if it cannot reach a consensus for a single count in the case.

Jurors posed the question to U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III on their fourth day of deliberations. They also said they would need a new verdict form.

Prosecutors say Manafort hid tens of millions of dollars in foreign income from Ukraine. They also say he lied on loan applications to obtain millions more to maintain a lavish lifestyle.

Manafort’s attorneys called no witnesses, arguing prosecutors failed to meet their burden of proof.

The trial is the first courtroom test of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, though the case doesn’t involve allegations of Russian election interference.

___

9:50 a.m.

The jury in the fraud trial of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has begun its fourth day of deliberations.

Judge T.S. Ellis III sent the jury back to resume deliberating Tuesday shortly after 9:30 a.m.

Jurors deliberated past 6 p.m. Monday without submitting notes or questions.

The trial of Manafort is now in its fourth week. Prosecutors say Manafort hid tens of millions of dollars in foreign income from Ukraine. They also say he lied on loan applications to obtain millions more to maintain a lavish lifestyle.

Manafort’s attorneys called no witnesses in his defence, arguing the prosecution failed to meet its burden of proof.

The trial is the first courtroom test of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, though the case doesn’t involve allegations of Russian election interference.

The Associated Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Making memories: Quesnel Lake a second home for Gerich family

The family moved around B.C. for work but always returned to Quesnel Lake

Quesnel and District Daycare needs to find new home by winter

The daycare is a non-profit society and has asked city for help

This and that for seniors: play phone magic now for real

My smartphone … yes, I do have one, is way smarter than me

Canadian policing organization calls for decriminalization of simple illicit drug possession

Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police want policing focus of opioid crisis to be replaced with a health one

Survey, hotline launched amid probe into racist blood-alcohol guessing game at B.C. hospital

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond has been appointed to lead an investigation by Health Minister Adrian Dix

B.C. appeals judge’s decision to leave three clubhouses in Hells Angels hands

The province has filed two notices of appeal related to the B.C. Supreme Court decision

Conservation officers relocate Spirit bear known to roam northwestern B.C.

Bear roamed valley north of Terrace for many years

B.C. premier applauds call to decriminalize drug possession

Police shouldn’t struggle with health issues, Horgan says

VIA Rail lays off 1,000 unionized workers across the country

Northern B.C. route Jasper to Prince George to Prince Rupert is not affected by VIA Rail layoffs

Indigenous leader Ed John pleads not guilty to historical sex charges

Ed John’s lawyer entered the plea by telephone on behalf of his client

Woman who talked to unconscious husband for 30 years gets solace from B.C. study

Ian Jordan suffered a head injury when he and another officer were on their way to a call in Victoria in September 1987

RCMP investigate threat against Indigenous totem poles on B.C.’s Sunshine Coast

Police describe the nature of the threat as ‘sensitive’

Most Read