Property values slip for Okanagan, Island

Residential property assessments are up slightly across most of B.C., with dips in average values in the Okanagan and on Vancouver Island

Condo construction in Victoria

Residential property assessments are up slightly across most of B.C., with dips in average values in the Okanagan and on Vancouver Island.

The biggest increases were in the Northwest and Peace River regions, where total residential value rose about 10 per cent as natural gas and other industrial development picks up speed.

The B.C. Assessment Authority released its 2014 property assessment rolls Thursday, showing continued slight growth in total property values in most regions of B.C. The value of all property in B.C. rose 1.27 per cent, despite declines in most regions for farm, recreational and managed forest land.

Assessments for regions and individual properties are available here, where property owners can find information on appealing their assessment for property tax purposes.

In the Lower Mainland, most residential values showed modest increases, from almost flat on the North Shore to 1.61 per cent in Vancouver, 0.68 in North Fraser, 1.98 per cent in Surrey-White Rock and 1.53 per cent in the Fraser Valley. Richmond-Delta recorded the only decline in the region, with residential total value down 0.15 per cent.

In Southern Vancouver Island, total residential property value fell 2.69 per cent, with similar decreases for recreational and farm property. Business property is up 3.89, and major industrial property jumped 17.45 per cent.

Central Vancouver Island residential property slipped 1.31 per cent, with similar decreases in industrial, recreational and farm property and a 2.67 per cent rise in business property. The Courtenay region saw residential values hold steady, with business property up 3.36 and farm and recreational values down two per cent.

Penticton region residential property is down 0.94 per cent, with a similar dip in farm value. Kelowna also had about a one per cent drop in farm value, with residential value steady compared to 2013. The Vernon region saw a 1.57 per cent drop in residential value and a 1.95 per cent dip in farm value.

Residential property value was up 1.21 per cent in the Nelson-Trail region, up 1.31 per cent in the East Kootenay and up 0.76 per cent in the Kamloops region.

Residential value held steady in the Cariboo region, with declines recorded in industrial, farm and forest land.

The largest moves in the 2014 assessment roll were for managed forest land, which showed a jump of 15.3 per cent in the Fraser Valley and drops of 10 per cent or more in other regions.

Rod Bealing, executive director of the Private Forest Landowners Association, said the value reflects fluctuations in the price of logs, with property value lagging the timber market by several years.

 

Just Posted

The “King of Sailplane Aerobatics” coming to SkyFest in Quesnel

Manfred Radius has been flying since 1961, logging more than 2,000 hours in various sailplanes

Meet Quesnel’s Firesmart representative

Amanda Vibert is coordinating Firesmart workshops around town and assessing individual homes

Quesnel Crossfire season ends with a fizzle

The team was suspended from Prince George Senior Lacrosse league after forfeiting second game

Forestry Ink: The Chinchaga firestorm

Jim Hilton returns with his regular column

Wells’ Sunset Theatre unveils summer season lineup

The lineup features award-winning touring productions, play readings, concerts, and world premieres

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Give Hope Wings fundraiser launches Saturday from Pitt Meadows

Flying marathon will benefit low income Canadians needing flights for medical treatment

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Most Read