QDTA ceasing all extra-curricular activities

A total of 21,625 teachers voted in favour of the AGM’s resistance strategy to oppose Bill 22, while 7,846 voted no.

After last Thursday’s vote to oppose Bill 22, teachers across the province are ceasing all extra-curricular activities.

“The decision was not an easy one,” Quesnel District Teachers’ Association president Teri Moorin said, adding the association is planning a public information forum.

A total of 21,625 teachers voted in favour of the AGM’s resistance strategy to oppose Bill 22, while 7,846 voted no.

Mooring said next steps include embarking on a resistance strategy to oppose the bill, including teachers withdrawing from any extra-curricular activities.

“It is with heavy-hearts that teachers have made this choice,” Mooring said.

“Many teachers entered the profession because of their deep love of sport, theatre, music and more. Teachers did not take this decision lightly, tremendous joy and satisfaction comes from this engagement with students in these valuable activities outside of class time.”

Teachers opposition to Bill 22 rests largely with class size and composition as the legislation removes most limits.

It also eliminates the need for consultation about class size and composition. Previously  teachers in grades 4 – 7 had to be consulted with if their class exceeded 30 students.

“It [Bill] also imposes financial compensation if the teacher consents to a class exceeding 30,” Mooring said.

“We are completely against additional compensation – it’s completely unethical.”

The legislation also removes consultation with teachers on students with individual education plans. Previously if a teacher had more than three students with an IEP they were automatically consulted.

Mooring said she expects the public forum to be announced by Monday and hopes residents take advantage of the opportunity to attend, ask questions and discuss the issues.

Currently all extra curricular activities can still go ahead with administration and/or parent volunteers.

“The withdrawal was a difficult decision, but it was the only option we had left,”  Mooring said.

“Teachers feel so strongly that Bill 22 is bad for students they are willing to go to these lengths.”