Firefighters on the Shovel Lake Fire help secure the containment line on Sept. 02, 2018. (BC Wildfire Service photo)

Regulations need to change for logging debris on-site, says BC Forest Practices Board

Chair of the board says current requirements from logging companies can be improved

Logging debris should be cleared up sooner and trees taken to mills faster than called for in current regulations to reduce wildfire hazards, indicates a B.C. Forest Practices Board finding released today.

The board drew the conclusions after a member of a wildfire response team at the Shovel Lake fire last summer complained that he saw lots of debris and decked timber in the fire zone.

“He was concerned the materials contributed to the spread and severity of the fire,” the release stated.

During the investigation, a dozen cutblocks within the perimeter of the fire were examined to determine whether the forest licensees had met legal requirements to abate fire hazards.

“It was found that the licensees had either abated the hazards as required or the time period allowed for hazard abatement had not yet passed. In some cases the licensees were still actively logging when the fire swept through, so the decked logs and debris were consumed by the fire before the licensees had a chance to deal with the hazard,” read the release.

Kevin Kriese, chair of the Forest Practices Board said the investigation found that licensees had done what they were required to do.

He said even though logging will reduce the risk of fire in areas with a high fuel level caused by the mountain beetle, current requirements leave room for improvement.

“The investigation found that current requirements could be improved by reducing the time before abatement is required and reducing the amount of fuel left behind,” Kriese said.

“The BC Wildfire Service has established a working group to look at the current abatement strategy. The board is recommending that review include the length of time before the hazard has to be treated and the amount of fuels permitted to be left on-site after abatement,” he said, adding other considerations such as smoke biodiversity, carbon sequestration and silviculture requirements.

READ MORE: VIDEO/PHOTOS: A look behind the scenes at the Horsefly Lake fire complex


Aman Parhar
Editor, Vanderhoof Omineca Express

aman.parhar@ominecaexpress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Snow making equipment means longer season for Quesnel x-country skiers

Cariboo Ski Touring Club is hoping temp drops to test out new gear at Hallis Lake

Quesnel fiddle contest celebrates 49th year

Local musician takes top prize in the championship category

Ranch Musings: The state of agriculture

Columnist David Zirnhelt is thankful for where they are and who they are

Cariboo-Prince George candidates give take on drugs, crime

Answers revolved around affordable housing and getting to the root cause of the problem

Forestry Ink: Replanting badly battered forest landscapes in B.C.

Regular columnist Jim Hilton writes about the potential for using drones in tree planting

VIDEO: #MeToo leader launches new hashtag to mobilize U.S. voters

Tarana Burke hopes to prompt moderators to ask about sexual violence at next debate

Potent power play paces Canucks to 5-1 win over Detroit

Miller nets a pair as Vancouver wins third straight

UPDATE: British couple vacationing in Vancouver detained in U.S. after crossing border

CBP claims individuals were denied travel authorization, crossing was deliberate

After losing two baby boys, B.C. parents hope to cut through the taboo of infant death

Oct. 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day in B.C.

Cheating husband sues mistress for gifted ring after wife learns about affair

The husband gave his mistress $1,000 to buy herself a ring in December 2017

B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

B.C. boosts legal aid funding in new payment contract

‘Duty counsel’ service restored in some communities, David Eby says

Rugby Canada helps recovery efforts in Japan after typhoon cancels final match

Canadian players wanted to “give back in whatever small way they could”

Alberta to join B.C.’s class-action lawsuit against opioid manufacturers, distributors

B.C. government claims opioids were falsely marketed as less addictive than other pain meds

Most Read