Researchers claim the ‘man flu’ does exist

Review of scientific studies suggests ‘man flu’ may be more intense: researcher

A review of scientific literature suggests those who believe “man flu” is more intense than the female version have some evidence to back up their views.

An article published by a Canadian physician in a recent edition of the British Medical Journal reviews medical studies going back to the 17th century on the role of gender in influenza.

Dr. Kyle Sue, a family physician based in Arviat, Nunavut, found studies on mice and humans suggesting flu symptoms in men are often more acute.

His study also noted that a seasonal influenza study from 2004 to 2010 in Hong Kong found men had higher rates of hospital admission, and a decade-long American observational study that ended in 2007 suggested men had higher rates of flu-related deaths in comparison to women.

The latter study held true regardless of underlying heart disease, cancer, chronic respiratory system disease, and renal disease.

In his study, Sue also notes that the term man flu has become so common that it is included in the Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries, with Oxford defining it as “a cold or similar minor ailment as experienced by a man who is regarded as exaggerating the severity of the symptoms.”

Sue writes: “Since about half the world’s population is male, deeming male viral respiratory symptoms as ‘exaggerated’ without rigorous scientific evidence could have important implications for men, including insufficient provision of care.”

Sue’s study also considered the hypothesis that testosterone may have a relationship to influenza by acting to suppress the male immune system.

He notes there are numerous potential weaknesses in the “immunity gap” theory, including that it doesn’t always consider other influences on the flu such as the rates of smoking and whether men are more or less likely to take preventive measures against the flu.

The physician also cites theories that evolution plays a role in men taking more rest than women for flu, and includes one hypothesis arguing that “the increase in male sickness may be a strategy important for survival since ‘it promotes energy conservation and reduces the risk of encountering predators.’”

“Further high quality research is needed to clarify other aspects of man flu,” says Sue’s article, with possible topics including the impact of environmental conditions on flu in males.

In addition, he raises the question of whether men who have the flu are more successful at finding mates.

“In other words, can the blame for man flu be shifted to the people who select these men as sexual partners rather than the men themselves?”

In his conclusion, Sue says the idea of “man flu” and suggestions males exaggerate their suffering is potentially unjust.

“Men may not be exaggerating symptoms but have weaker immune responses to viral respiratory viruses, leading to greater morbidity and mortality than seen in women,” says the journal article.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Quesnel’s Gold Pain City Derby Girls Host Gold Rush Rumble

Event will take place on Saturday at 5 p.m. at West Fraser Centre

Police presence increased for Billy Barker Days

Expect to see RCMP in high traffic areas, and more patrol cars on the roads during the festival

Quesnel rider wins MCQMX North and South Series

Morrison’s commitment to riding sets her apart from competition

Making a splash at North American Diving Dogs competition

It’s Erin and Tim Lynes’ third summer hosting dock diving events

Seniors’ Day in the park kicks off Billy Barker Days

Hundreds of local seniors enjoyed lunch and entertainment in LeBourdais Park

Here’s what you need to know about Day 1 at the BC Games

All 18 events kick off on the track, riding ring, fields, courts and lake in the Cowichan Valley

VIDEO: How to throw a frisbee

Ultimate frisbee player Amy Mackay shows off the proper technique

Site C dam project plagued by problems: expert

E. Harvey Elwin expresses concern about internal BC Hydro and government documents

Seal attacks kayakers in the Broughton Archipelago

“It has to be one chance in a million of this happening.”

Victoria-area park sign removed after glitch redirects to porn site

Resident looking to learn more about workout equipment discovered the problem code

Special Olympic athletes take on BC Games during special anniversary

Known as the Global Day of Inclusion, July 20 marks the first Special Olympics in 1968 in Chicago

Scammers dressed as Mounties threaten to arrest senior if she doesn’t cough up cash

Pair of fraudulent officers threaten to arrest 90-year-old woman

Fundraiser to help mom of jogger detained after crossing U.S. border

Cedella Roman, 19, was held in U.S. after accidentally crossing border in South Surrey

Okanagan Wildfires: The latest on wildfires and evacuations

A Friday morning look at the major wildfires impact the Okanagan and Similkameen.

Most Read