Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resources Operations and Rural Development image

Some open burning to be allowed again in Cariboo Fire Centre

Ministry to lift ban on Category 2 fires Sept. 14 at noon

Due to decreased wildfire risk, Category 2 open fires will be allowed in the Cariboo Fire Centre after 12 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, announced the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development.

Larger Category 3 open fires are still prohibited in the region, however, until Sept. 29, 2018, or until the public is notified otherwise, said a Ministry news release.

The following activities will also be allowed throughout the Cariboo Fire Centre as of noon on Sept. 14:

* the burning of stubble or grass in an area under 0.2 hectares

* the burning of one or two piles concurrently (no larger than two metres high by three metres wide)

* the use of sky lanterns

* the use of tiki torches and chimineas

* the use of fireworks, including firecrackers

* the use of burn barrels or burning cages of any size or description

* the use of binary exploding targets (e.g. for target practice)

* the use of air curtain burners (forced-air burning systems)

READ MORE: Campfire ban lifted in Cariboo, Kamloops and Prince George fire centres

The Ministry urges anyone wishing to conduct a Category 2 burn to first check with local authorities for any other restrictions before lighting any fire. Anyone who lights, fuels or uses a Category 2 open fire must comply with the Environmental Management Act and the open burning smoke control regulation. The act requires individuals to check local venting conditions prior to lighting a fire and ensure that conditions are favourable for burning. Local venting conditions can be obtained by calling 1-888-281-2992 or visiting: www.env.gov.bc.ca/epd/epdpa/venting/venting.html

Anyone lighting a campfire must maintain a fireguard by removing flammable debris from around the campfire area. They must never leave the campfire unattended, and must have a hand tool or at least eight litres of water available nearby to properly extinguish it. Make sure that the ashes are cold to the touch before leaving the area for any length of time.

Anyone found in contravention of an open burning prohibition may be issued a ticket for $1,150, required to pay an administrative penalty of $10,000 or, if convicted in court, fined up to $100,000 and/or sentenced to one year in jail. If the contravention causes or contributes to a wildfire, the person responsible may be ordered to pay all firefighting and associated costs.

To report a wildfire, unattended campfire or open burning violation, call *5555 on a cellphone or 1 800 663-5555 toll-free. For the latest information on current wildfire activity, burning restrictions, road closures and air quality advisories, visit: www.bcwildfire.ca



editor@quesnelobserver.com

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