Ted Hughes, head of the APEC inquiry, listens to testimony at the hearings in Vancouver Tuesday Dec. 14, 1999. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody

Ted Hughes, B.C.’s first conflict watchdog, dies at 92

Hughes know for reviews of child welfare systems and sale of Bill Vander Zalm’s Fantasy Gardens home

Ted Hughes, whose reports led to the resignation of a premier and the overhaul of child welfare systems in B.C. and Manitoba, has died at the age of 92.

Hughes was B.C.’s first conflict of interest commissioner and his reviews of the child welfare systems after the deaths of Sherry Charlie in B.C. and Phoenix Sinclair in Manitoba prompted change.

Conflict of interest commissioner Victoria Gray says Hughes, who died Friday in Victoria, will be remembered for his compassion, determination and clarity of thought.

She says Hughes leaves a legacy that includes stronger ethical constraints on politicians and the establishment of an independent office in B.C. representing children and youth.

Hughes served as conflict of interest commissioner from 1990 to 1997, but his lengthy career also included service as a lawyer, judge, senior civil servant and commissioner of inquiry into the deaths of children in public care.

His 1991 conflict investigation report into former premier Bill Vander Zalm’s sale of his private Fantasy Gardens home to a billionaire Taiwanese businessman resulted in Vander Zalm’s resignation.

RELATED: B.C. political legend Grace McCarthy dies (May 2017)

Former B.C. children’s representative Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond says she applied for the position after reading a 2006 report by Hughes calling for stability in the child welfare system.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Quesnel Waveriders win 77 medals at home meet

Twenty Quesnel swimmers won medals during the Feb. 8-9 event

Forestry Hockey League: BCS reclaims top spot

BCS rolls over Bear 5-1, while Serenity snaps losing streak with a 4-3 win over Fraser River

Letter to the editor: Quesnel Good Cheer program helped 638 families in 2019

Volunteers thank the community and vow to keep looking for a solution to keep Good Cheer going

Forestry Ink: Using salts to capture and store solar thermal energy?

Regular columnist Jim Hilton shares more information about solar energy

Community contributions recognized during Quesnel Gallery of Honour presentation

The Quesnel & District Community Arts Council recognized Bert deVink, Jack Nelson and Destinee Boyd

VIDEO: Ottawa wants quick, peaceful resolution to pipeline protests, Trudeau says

The protests have manifested themselves as blockades on different rail lines across the country

Canucks acquire forward Tyler Toffoli from Kings in push for playoffs

Vancouver sends Schaller, Madden, pick to L.A.

New highway proposed between Alberta and B.C.

The route would connect Red Deer to Kamloops

Wet’suwet’en and B.C. government have been talking Aboriginal title for a year

Coastal GasLink says it has agreements with all 20 elected First Nations councils along the 670-kilometre route

Trudeau tightlipped on plan to end protests ‘quickly and peacefully’

The prime minister, who cancelled a two-day trip to Barbados this week to deal with the crisis at home

B.C. budget expected to stay the course as economic growth moderates

Finance minister said ICBC costs have affected budget

Canadian standards for coronavirus protection to be reviewed, health agency says

The protocols set out how health workers should protect themselves and their patients

Monday marks one-year anniversary of man missing from Langley

42-year-old B.C. man, Searl Smith, was last seen leaving Langley Memorial Hospital on Feb. 17, 2019

BC Ferries sailings filling up Family Day Monday

More than 20 sailings added between Swartz Bay and Tsawwassen for long weekend

Most Read