Editorial: Bad seeds

The federal government is bent on pushing medical marijuana grow operations out of residential homes.

The federal government is bent on pushing medical marijuana grow operations out of residential homes.

Crime and safety – home invasions, faulty wiring and mould – are the main reasons, and the plan has the backing of fire chiefs in B.C.

An apartment fire in Maple Ridge on Dec. 13, which left dozens of people homeless, illustrates their concerns, as investigators found three grow ops on the second floor, where the fire started, and which they believe was electrical in origin.

But Health Canada has said that the proposed legislation, which would regulate medical marijuana grow ops and push them to industrial or agricultural areas, where they would be subject to inspections, will drive up the purchase price.

Would that not fuel illegal grows and trade, similar to what occurs now?

Wouldn’t that nullify any changes to eliminate safety risks?

Part of the plan is to let Health Canada medical possession and grow licenses expire in 2014.

They will, in future, be more difficult to acquire, which is good, as some seem to have fallen into hands that can’t resist growing more than their licenses permit, and selling to people other than those who need it for medicinal purposes. What if, under the new regulations, some who do need it for that reason can’t afford to buy from newly licensed growers?

Who benefits then?

The federal government’s plan seems only to serve those who can afford to establish commercial grow op businesses, and put those who subvert the process into prison.

Why not regulate, license and disclose small grows in homes, window-sill-type operations for personal, medicinal use?

Why not follow Washington and Colorado, and just legalize recreational use?

Clearly there is much money to be made in marijuana, and in Canada, we’re wasting way too much money and time trying to curb what is beyond the control of our authorities.

Taking away patients’ personal production licences is akin to punishing all because of a few bad seeds.

 

–Observer

 

 

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