Letter: who does supply management benefit?

Editor,

Supply management was created in the 1960’s by farmers and government to regulate perishable commodities such as eggs, poultry and dairy products. This board also sets the price per unit based on the cost of production, controls the quality and safety by regulating the use of medicines and prohibits the use of genetically modified hormones which are allowed in dairy across the border. This body also ensures that processing is done locally, meaning less travel, fresher products and local employment. But the real value of supply managed agriculture can been clearly seen by comparing apples to apples right here in Canada.

Non-supply managed agriculture sectors include beef, pork, and cash crops such as corn, soybeans and wheat. These sectors are supported by subsidies, grants and insurance programs used to infuse cash into a system that sees farmers with no options other than to sell their commodities below the cost of production, thanks to a global marketplace. Canada-wide, these transfers are commonly around 1.5 billion dollars per year, with the majority going to large scale operations receiving millions each. The government delivers a disproportionate amount of cash to the largest producers, encourage huge fields and feedlots instead of smaller traditional family farms.This model is used by all countries who want to sell in a global market, as one country provides payments, others must do the same if they want to compete in exports.

In Canada you will only pay for your milk once, as supply managed sectors do not draw from these pools, (they don’t need to). Milk producers get paid for what they produce and only what they produce: this does not create inefficiencies, but rather the opposite. Programs that require taxpayers to pay twice for their food does a far better job of encouraging non profitable operation. Dismantling supply management will do little to ease the States’ overproduction issues and not for long, and will destroy one of the few successful farming models Canada has left.

If you like paying once for safe dairy products benefiting local farmers instead of multinational corporations, you need supply management!

Leo Manion

National Farmers Union member from Mount Forrest, Ontario

Just Posted

CRD develops internal policy for single-use plastics for its own operations

Chair Margo Wagner said the CRD is proud to be taking steps to reduces its environmental footprint

Chief calls for state of emergency and fishery closure in light of Big Bar slide in Fraser River

Chief Robbins said his own community of Esket will not fish until the slide is dealt with

Severe thunderstorm watch in effect for Cariboo region

Potential for strong wind gusts, large hail and heavy rain in the afternoon

Female Trail Builder leaving her mark on Quesnel’s Dragon Mountain

Marie Scharf is building mountain bike paths with First Journey Trails

Quesnel barrel racer finishes in top spot at Pritchard Rodeo

Ashley Zappone and her horse, Lady, now sit fifth in the BCRA standings

Joaquin ‘El Chapo’ Guzman sentenced to life in prison

Experts say he will likely wind up at the federal government’s Supermax prison in Florence, Colorado

Will you be celebrating national hotdog day with any of these crazy flavours?

The popularity of hotdogs spans generations, cultures

Former home of accused Penticton shooter vandalized

Ex-wife of man who is accused of murdering four people had her house vandalized

Survivor of near-drowning in B.C. lake viewing life through new eyes

“If I died that day, the baby wouldn’t know his dad,” said 31-year-old Mariano Santander-Melo.

‘Beyond the call’: Teen in police custody gets birthday surprise by B.C. Mountie

Unusual celebration started when Staff Sgt. Paul Vadik went to visit the teen in his Coquitlam cell

B.C. mom to go to Europe court in hopes of getting alleged abducted daughter back

Tasha Brown alleges her estranged wife abducted their daughter Kaydance Etchells in 2016

Driver who killed B.C. motorcyclist receives absolute discharge

Chase family speechless following decision by BC Review Board

Lower gas prices slow annual inflation rate to Bank of Canada’s 2% bull’s-eye

Prices showed strength in other areas — led by a 17.3 per cent increase in the cost of fresh vegetables

B.C. moves to preserve 54 of its biggest, oldest trees

Fir, cedar, spruce, pine, yew set aside from logging

Most Read