forestry

Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Quesnel Observer.

FORESTRY INK: COLUMN Technology an asset in science communications

Jim Hilton uses mushroom research to show how technology has changed science

  • Feb 13, 2021

 

Forestry Initiatives Manager, Erin Robinson, holding the FireSmart Community Protection Achievement Award. The program is up for another award to be awarded this February. (Submitted Photo)

Quesnel’s Forestry program recognized through nomination

The Forestry Initiatives Program has been nominated for a BC Cleantech award

 

Biomass storage domes at Drax Power Station in Yorkshire, England, a former coal-fired plant that is Europe’s largest decarbonization project. Drax has bid to take over Pinnacle Renewable Energy, the B.C.-based pellet maker that is now the world’s second largest. Photo © Chris Allen (cc-by-sa/2.0) Geograph.org.uk

British firm Drax bids to buy B.C.-based pellet maker Pinnacle

Wood waste company has expanded into Alberta, U.S.

 

Compost and wood chips are among the many organic mulches that provide multiple benefits to plants and the soil when spread on top of the ground. (Lee Reich via AP)

FORESTRY INK COLUMN: The benefits of branch wood chips

Jim Hilton’s column explores how to best use wood chips in gardening

  • Feb 7, 2021
Compost and wood chips are among the many organic mulches that provide multiple benefits to plants and the soil when spread on top of the ground. (Lee Reich via AP)
The province has said that it will consider the findings and recommendations of the report prepared by Dr. Peter Wood to meet its CleanBC goals. Photo by Binny Paul/Campbell River Mirror.

B.C. will consider recommendations of report linking climate change to logging practices

Province says it is working with First Nations and forest industry towards CleanBC goals

The province has said that it will consider the findings and recommendations of the report prepared by Dr. Peter Wood to meet its CleanBC goals. Photo by Binny Paul/Campbell River Mirror.
Cariboo Pulp and Paper in Quesnel is getting a funding boost from the Forest Enhancement Society of B.C.(West Fraser Photo)

Quesnel pulp manufacturer gets fibre funding boost

The Forest Enhancement Society of B.C. is distributing $3 million across the province

Cariboo Pulp and Paper in Quesnel is getting a funding boost from the Forest Enhancement Society of B.C.(West Fraser Photo)
In a report released on Monday, Sierra Club BC said that majority of climate risks – including droughts, wildfires and landslides – are influenced by industrial logging. (Photo by Binny Paul/ Campbell River Mirror)

Logging practices increase risk of climate change disasters in B.C.: report

Sierra Club BC calls for forestry reforms and inclusion of Indigenous expertise to mitigate climate disaster risks

In a report released on Monday, Sierra Club BC said that majority of climate risks – including droughts, wildfires and landslides – are influenced by industrial logging. (Photo by Binny Paul/ Campbell River Mirror)
Forestry Ink columnist Jim Hilton. (File Photo)

Ramial chipped wood promotes longterm soil health

Jim Hilton breaks down soil technology

  • Jan 31, 2021
Forestry Ink columnist Jim Hilton. (File Photo)
A drone operator with Terra Remote Sensing, one of the sponsors of the B.C. Natural Resources Forum. (Terra Remote Sensing image)

‘Digitizing the forest or mill’ a key part of B.C. industry’s future

Drones help manage land, inventory with COVID-19 restrictions

A drone operator with Terra Remote Sensing, one of the sponsors of the B.C. Natural Resources Forum. (Terra Remote Sensing image)
An array of cabinet ministers speak to resource development approvals at B.C. Natural Resources Forum Jan. 21: Energy and Mines Minister Bruce Ralston, Environment Minister George Heyman, Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon, Indigenous Relations Minister Murray Rankin, Minister of State for Lands and Natural Resource Operations Nathan Cullen and Forests Minister Katrine Conroy. (BCNRF)

B.C.s low-carbon economy plan depends on faster resource permits

13 years to allow a mine won’t work, cabinet ministers reminded

An array of cabinet ministers speak to resource development approvals at B.C. Natural Resources Forum Jan. 21: Energy and Mines Minister Bruce Ralston, Environment Minister George Heyman, Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon, Indigenous Relations Minister Murray Rankin, Minister of State for Lands and Natural Resource Operations Nathan Cullen and Forests Minister Katrine Conroy. (BCNRF)
Inspection of bridge crossing on a B.C. forest service road. (B.C. Forest Practices Board)

B.C. falling behind in maintenance of forest service roads

Auditor finds nearly half of bridges overdue for repair

Inspection of bridge crossing on a B.C. forest service road. (B.C. Forest Practices Board)
Forestry companies in B.C. agree to abide by the cedar protocols based on traditional laws of the First Nation members of the Nanwakolas Council. (Photo courtesy, Nanwakolas Council)

Landmark deal sees B.C. forest firms treat big cedars like a First Nation would

Western Forest Products, Interfor among companies to adapt declaration drafted by Nanwakolas Council

Forestry companies in B.C. agree to abide by the cedar protocols based on traditional laws of the First Nation members of the Nanwakolas Council. (Photo courtesy, Nanwakolas Council)
Cheslatta Carrier Nation received a grant in 2020 to help cover the costs of shipping fire-damaged trees to a pellet plant or bioenergy facility. (Forest Enhancement Society of B.C.)

B.C. pellet contract with Japanese giant extended past 2023

Mitsubishi buying 80,000 tonnes a year from Pinnacle

Cheslatta Carrier Nation received a grant in 2020 to help cover the costs of shipping fire-damaged trees to a pellet plant or bioenergy facility. (Forest Enhancement Society of B.C.)
“Leave the best, take the rest” is a catchy phrase that describes spacing/commercial thinning systems that have been used for years in some European forest industries, explains columnist Jim Hilton. (Black Press File Photo)

FORESTRY INK: Leave the best and take the rest

Columnist Jim Hilton writes about thinning systems and biodiversity in forestry

  • Dec 27, 2020
“Leave the best, take the rest” is a catchy phrase that describes spacing/commercial thinning systems that have been used for years in some European forest industries, explains columnist Jim Hilton. (Black Press File Photo)
This graphic shows the value chain of bioproducts from forest biomass. (Photo Submitted)

Lhtako Dené, Nazko, City of Quesnel and Clean Energy Consulting partner in new biomass study

The initial biomass inventory is expected to be completed by mid-March

This graphic shows the value chain of bioproducts from forest biomass. (Photo Submitted)
Forestry Ink columnist Jim Hilton. (File Photo)

FORESTRY INK: Stimulation of local economy with heli bike proposal

Columnist Jim Hilton writes about a new proposal for south of Tatla Lake

  • Dec 19, 2020
Forestry Ink columnist Jim Hilton. (File Photo)
Forestry Ink columnist Jim Hilton. (File Photo)

FORESTRY INK: Responsible use of herbicides

Columnist Jim Hilton writes about the issue of spraying herbicides like glyphosate

  • Nov 29, 2020
Forestry Ink columnist Jim Hilton. (File Photo)
A big job: Former forests minister Doug Donaldson stands before a 500-year-old Douglas fir in Saanich to announce preservation of some of B.C.’s oldest trees, July 2019. (B.C. government)

B.C. returning to ‘stand-alone’ forests, rural development ministry

Horgan says Gordon Campbell’s super-ministry doesn’t work

A big job: Former forests minister Doug Donaldson stands before a 500-year-old Douglas fir in Saanich to announce preservation of some of B.C.’s oldest trees, July 2019. (B.C. government)
Twenty-three B.C. mayors have asked Premier John Horgan to enshrine five pillars of action that give natural resource development a key role in B.C.’s post-pandemic economic recovery plan. (Williams Lake Tribune file photo)

B.C. mayors want key role for resource development in pandemic recovery

23 leaders pen letter to premier, asking for inclusion in new policy discussions

Twenty-three B.C. mayors have asked Premier John Horgan to enshrine five pillars of action that give natural resource development a key role in B.C.’s post-pandemic economic recovery plan. (Williams Lake Tribune file photo)
Representatives from the governments of Lhtako Dene, Nazko, Lhoosk’uz, ?Esdilagh, the City of Quesnel and the Cariboo Regional District, along with staff from the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (FLNRORD) and the B.C. Community Forest Association met June 24 to discuss next steps in the community forest process. A formal community forest application has not been received yet, but Quesnel’s city manager, Byron Johnson, tells council it is imminent. (Photo Submitted)

City of Quesnel moves community forest process forward, enters into participation agreement

City manager Byron Johnson expects a formal invitation to apply to come soon

Representatives from the governments of Lhtako Dene, Nazko, Lhoosk’uz, ?Esdilagh, the City of Quesnel and the Cariboo Regional District, along with staff from the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (FLNRORD) and the B.C. Community Forest Association met June 24 to discuss next steps in the community forest process. A formal community forest application has not been received yet, but Quesnel’s city manager, Byron Johnson, tells council it is imminent. (Photo Submitted)