forestry

Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Quesnel Cariboo Observer.

FOREST INK: Impact of wildfires on resident animals studied

The changes in body condition were monitored using images from trail cameras on a grid

  • Feb 13, 2022
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Quesnel Cariboo Observer.
Fresh cut sawdust is seen from a tree cut near the “heli camp” in the Fairy Creek logging area near Port Renfrew, B.C., Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Crown calls application to stay charges in B.C. old-growth logging case flawed

Lawyer: Fairy Creek protest group’s petition lacks ‘factual foundation,’ not the way justice is done

Fresh cut sawdust is seen from a tree cut near the “heli camp” in the Fairy Creek logging area near Port Renfrew, B.C., Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
The clouds move among the old growth forest in the Fairy Creek logging area near Port Renfrew, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. forest protest accused ask court to stay charges due to ’ systemic police misconduct’

RCMP have made close to 1,200 arrests enforcing Fairy Creek injunction

The clouds move among the old growth forest in the Fairy Creek logging area near Port Renfrew, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Dr. Suzanne Simard of Nelson, a professor of forest ecology at UBC, is the author of Finding the Mother Tree, published in 2021 and slated to be made into a full length film. Photo: Bill Metcalfe

FOREST INK: Making forest policy changes can be painfully slow

Unfortunately it takes time for some to accept a new approach

  • Feb 6, 2022
Dr. Suzanne Simard of Nelson, a professor of forest ecology at UBC, is the author of Finding the Mother Tree, published in 2021 and slated to be made into a full length film. Photo: Bill Metcalfe
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the <em>Williams Lake Tribune. </em>

FOREST INK: Updating forest polices to keep pace with changing times

Columnist Jim Hilton says we may have to do forestry differently in the future

  • Jan 30, 2022
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the <em>Williams Lake Tribune. </em>
People listen to Pacheedaht elder Bill Jones in the Fairy Creek logging area near Port Renfrew, B.C. Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

UPDATED: B.C. Appeal Court extends injunction against protests at Fairy Creek

An earlier B.C. Supreme Court decision denied the company’s application for an extension

People listen to Pacheedaht elder Bill Jones in the Fairy Creek logging area near Port Renfrew, B.C. Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Tribune.

FOREST INK: The wisdom of history

Wisdom, justice, courage and moderation are the basis for a moral and successful life

  • Jan 22, 2022
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Tribune.
Dallas Smith, president of the Nanwakolas Council, an organization of B.C. coast and Vancouver Island first nations. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

Four coastal B.C. first nations agree on further old-growth deferrals

Western Forest Products says more cooperation to come

Dallas Smith, president of the Nanwakolas Council, an organization of B.C. coast and Vancouver Island first nations. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)
FILE – Smoke rises from the Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake, B.C. Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

BAINS: Worker protections remain key 10 years after fatal northern B.C. sawmill explosions

Four workers died in two separate explosions at sawmills near Burns Lake and Prince George in 2012

  • Jan 19, 2022
FILE – Smoke rises from the Babine Forest Products mill in Burns Lake, B.C. Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Quesnel Observer.

FOREST INK: Climate change could be mitigated by Peatland forest mosaics

Peat is one of the main and arguably most important component of the boreal forests

  • Jan 15, 2022
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Quesnel Observer.
A truckload of B.C. lumber heads to the United States, which has imposed steep border duties on standard construction lumber that is in short supply as timber cutting restrictions increase. (Resource Works Society)

B.C.’s value-added forest industry pleads for old-growth wood

‘We’re talking months until we’re running out’

A truckload of B.C. lumber heads to the United States, which has imposed steep border duties on standard construction lumber that is in short supply as timber cutting restrictions increase. (Resource Works Society)
RBC Dominion Securities analyst Paul Quinn, Truck Loggers Association executive director Bob Brash and consultant Russ Taylor speak to delegates at the association’s virtual convention, Jan. 12, 2022. (TLA video)

Forest industry analysts paint grim picture for B.C. investment future

Old growth restrictions threaten value added, truck loggers told

RBC Dominion Securities analyst Paul Quinn, Truck Loggers Association executive director Bob Brash and consultant Russ Taylor speak to delegates at the association’s virtual convention, Jan. 12, 2022. (TLA video)
Logs await milling at a Canfor sawmill in Prince George in 2017. Declining allowable harvest in the B.C. Interior and anti-logging protests on the coast have the B.C. forest company investing outside the province. (Canfor Corp. photo)

B.C. old-growth forest preservation plan off to a slow start for 2022

Canfor buys Alberta sawmills, sends harsh message to NDP

Logs await milling at a Canfor sawmill in Prince George in 2017. Declining allowable harvest in the B.C. Interior and anti-logging protests on the coast have the B.C. forest company investing outside the province. (Canfor Corp. photo)
Much of B.C.’s tree planting program so far has been replacing harvested trees, which minimizes the albedo effect. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. expected to dodge emerging climate change problem tied to tree planting

Trees combat climate change, but can also lead to the warming albedo effect

Much of B.C.’s tree planting program so far has been replacing harvested trees, which minimizes the albedo effect. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Quesnel Observer.

Ecotourism in ancient boreal forests

Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry for the Quesnel Observer each week

Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Quesnel Observer.
Forest ecologist Andy MacKinnon, who previously worked with the B.C Government on developing land-use plans beyond logging, speaks about the importance of revenue options for First Nations on Tuesday at the legislature. (Kiernan Green/News Staff)

B.C. ancient forest advocates call on province to fund alternative revenue streams

$300M required to help First Nations, other forest-dependent communities to transition

Forest ecologist Andy MacKinnon, who previously worked with the B.C Government on developing land-use plans beyond logging, speaks about the importance of revenue options for First Nations on Tuesday at the legislature. (Kiernan Green/News Staff)
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Observer.

FOREST INK: B.C. has the potential for strong composting industry

Jim Hilton pens a column for the Quesnel Observer each week

  • Dec 19, 2021
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Observer.
The clouds move among the old growth forest in the Fairy Creek logging area near Port Renfrew, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. The British Columbia government says it is finalizing plans with First Nations that have indicated support for plans to defer logging in certain old-growth forests, while it continues talks with nations that need more time to decide.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. hears from 161 First Nations on plans for old-growth logging deferrals

Nearly three-quarters of those responding indicated they need more time

The clouds move among the old growth forest in the Fairy Creek logging area near Port Renfrew, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021. The British Columbia government says it is finalizing plans with First Nations that have indicated support for plans to defer logging in certain old-growth forests, while it continues talks with nations that need more time to decide.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Observer.

FOREST INK: Learn from the past to make a better future

Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Quesnel Cariboo Observer

  • Dec 11, 2021
Jim Hilton pens a column on forestry each week for the Observer.
Brad Cyr is a third-generation logger from Port Hardy who began working a union job as a grapple yarder in Port Alberni in December. He brought his concerns and a freshly cut slice from a stump to the ‘Stand Up for Forestry’ rally on Johnston Road Dec. 9, 2021. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

B.C. loggers rally to protest government deferral plan for old-growth logging

Forestry workers, families mass in Port Alberni to speak out about move’s far-reaching effects

Brad Cyr is a third-generation logger from Port Hardy who began working a union job as a grapple yarder in Port Alberni in December. He brought his concerns and a freshly cut slice from a stump to the ‘Stand Up for Forestry’ rally on Johnston Road Dec. 9, 2021. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)