Harry and Meghan with their son, Archie. (Associated Press)

Harry and Meghan with their son, Archie. (Associated Press)

Harry and Meghan mark son’s 1st birthday with charity video

Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor was born on May 6, 2019 at London’s Portland Hospital

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have released a video of Meghan reading to their son as they mark Archie’s 1st birthday and promote a campaign to help children during the coronavirus pandemic.

The video shows Meghan sitting with Archie on her lap and reading one of his favourite books, “Duck! Rabbit!” Archie grabs at the pages and helps turn them during the reading. Harry, who filmed the short video, whoops and says “bravo” from behind the camera at the end.

The three-minute video was posted Wednesday on the Instagram accounts of Save With Stories and Save the Children U.K. for a fundraising campaign with the goal bringing food and learning resources to children and families struggling during the pandemic.

Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor was born on May 6, 2019 at London’s Portland Hospital. His parents chose not to pose with their newborn outside the hospital, a recent tradition in Harry’s family, and decided against giving the baby a royal name.

Archie had an eventful first year. He accompanied his parents on a tour of Africa and at the age of 4 months was introduced to Archbishop Desmond Tutu, a Nobel Peace Prize winner.

Harry and Meghan shocked many early this year with an announcement that they intended to quit as senior royals and split their time between Britain and North America. They couple officially stepped down from royal duties at the end of March, saying they were giving up public funding and seeking financial independence.

The family went from living in a cottage on the grounds of Windsor Castle, to Vancouver Island in Canada and then on to Los Angeles before lockdown measures commenced.

READ MORE: Four things ‘not’ to do if you run into Prince Harry and Meghan in B.C.

The Associated Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Royal family

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

People skate on a lake in a city park in Montreal, Sunday, January 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
The end of hugs: How COVID-19 has changed daily life a year after Canada’s 1st case

Today marks the one year anniversary of COVID-19 landing in Canada

The location of the proposed Telus cell tower is at the red pin. (Google Maps)
Telus proposes Wells cell tower

The project is available for public comment until March 1

Joyce Cooper (left) said she had to set an example for Tsilhqot’in communities by sharing her COVID-19 positive results. (Photo submitted)
Tsideldel off-reserve member documents experience of COVID-19

We should all be supporting one another and not judging each other, says Joyce Cooper

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Employers might be able to require COVID-19 vaccination from employees: B.C. lawyer

‘An employer must make the case’ using expert science, explains lawyer David Mardiros

Rose Sawka, 91, waves to her son through the window of a care home in Prince Rupert in October. Residents of the care home received their first vaccine dose Jan. 20. (K-J Millar/The Northern View)
B.C. care home visitor access to expand by March, Dix says

Staff, residents, essential visitors top priorities for vaccine

Kyrell Sopotyk was drafted by the Kamloops Blazers in 2016 and played two seasons with the Western Hockey League club. (Photograph By ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW)
Kamloops Blazer paralyzed in snowboarding accident sparks fundraiser for family

As of Jan. 24, more than $68,000 had been raised to help Kamloops Blazers’ forward Kyrell Sopotyk

Rodney and Ekaterina Baker in an undated photo from social media. The couple has been ticketed and charged under the Yukon’s <em>Civil Emergency Measures Act</em> for breaking isolation requirements in order to sneak into a vaccine clinic and receive Moderna vaccine doses in Beaver Creek. (Facebook/Submitted)
Great Canadian Gaming CEO resigns after being accused of sneaking into Yukon for vaccine

Rod Baker and Ekaterina Baker were charged with two CEMA violations each

(Pixhere photo)
B.C. dentists argue for COVID-19 vaccine priority after ‘disappointing’ exclusion from plan

Vaccines are essential for dentists as patients cannot wear masks during treatment, argues BCDA

The fine for changing lanes or merging over a solid line costs drivers $109 and two penalty points in B.C. (Screenshot via Google Street View)
B.C. drivers caught crossing, merging over solid white lines face hefty fine

Ticket for $109, two penalty points issued under Motor Vehicle Act for crossing solid lines

A registered nurse prepares a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in Halifax on Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. Yukon’s Minister of Community Services, John Streiker, says he’s outraged that a couple from outside the territory travelled to a remote community this week and received doses of COVID-19 vaccine. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan-POOL
Couple charged after travelling to Yukon to get COVID-19 vaccine

The maximum fine under the emergency measures act is $500, and up to six months in jail

Metis Nation of B.C. President Clara Morin Dal Col poses in this undated handout photo. The Metis Nation of B.C. says Dal Col has been suspended from her role as president. The Metis Nation of B.C. says Dal Col has been suspended from her role as president. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Metis Nation of B.C. *MANDATORY CREDIT*
Metis Nation of B.C. suspends president, citing ‘breach’ of policies, procedures

Vice-president Lissa Smith is stepping in to fill the position on an acting basis

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks in the in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Payette shouldn’t get same benefits as other ex-governors general: O’Toole

Former governors general are entitled to a pension and also get a regular income paid to them for the rest of their lives

A woman injects herself with crack cocaine at a supervised consumption site Friday, Jan. 22, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Drug users at greater risk of dying as services scale back in second wave of COVID-19

It pins the blame largely on a lack of supports, a corrupted drug supply

Most Read